2016 Updated MASCC/ESMO Consensus Recommendations: Controlling nausea and vomiting with chemotherapy of low or minimal emetic potential

Ian Olver, Christina H. Ruhlmann, Franziska Jahn, Lee Schwartzberg, Bernardo Rapoport, Cynthia N. Rittenberg, Rebecca Clark-Snow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this review is to update the MASCC (Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer) guidelines for controlling nausea and vomiting with chemotherapy of low or minimal emetic potential. Methods: The antiemetic study group of MASCC met in Copenhagen in 2015 to review the MASCC antiemetic guidelines. A subgroup performed a systematic literature review on antiemetics for low emetogenic chemotherapy (LEC) and chemotherapy of minimal emetic potential and the chair presented the update recommendation to the whole group for discussion. They then voted with an aim of achieving 67 % or greater consensus. Results: For patients receiving low emetogenic chemotherapy, a single antiemetic such as dexamethasone, a 5HT3 receptor antagonist, or a dopamine receptor antagonist may be considered for prophylaxis of acute emesis. For patients receiving chemotherapy of minimal emetogenicity, no antiemetic should be routinely administered. If patients vomit, they should be treated as for chemotherapy of low emetic potential. No antiemetic should be administered for prevention of delayed nausea and vomiting induced by low or minimally emetogenic chemotherapy. Conclusions: More research is needed to determine the incidence of emesis, particularly delayed emesis, in the LEC group. Prospective studies are required to evaluate antiemetic strategies. The risk of emesis within LEC may be more accurately determined by adding the patient risk factors for emesis to those of the chemotherapy drugs. Improved strategies for promoting adherence to guidelines are required.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-301
Number of pages5
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Emetics
Nausea
Vomiting
Antiemetics
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms
Guidelines
Guideline Adherence
Dopamine Antagonists
Dexamethasone
Prospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology

Cite this

2016 Updated MASCC/ESMO Consensus Recommendations : Controlling nausea and vomiting with chemotherapy of low or minimal emetic potential. / Olver, Ian; Ruhlmann, Christina H.; Jahn, Franziska; Schwartzberg, Lee; Rapoport, Bernardo; Rittenberg, Cynthia N.; Clark-Snow, Rebecca.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 297-301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Olver, Ian ; Ruhlmann, Christina H. ; Jahn, Franziska ; Schwartzberg, Lee ; Rapoport, Bernardo ; Rittenberg, Cynthia N. ; Clark-Snow, Rebecca. / 2016 Updated MASCC/ESMO Consensus Recommendations : Controlling nausea and vomiting with chemotherapy of low or minimal emetic potential. In: Supportive Care in Cancer. 2017 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 297-301.
@article{341ddb055a194846bb2fc3b61797a0ca,
title = "2016 Updated MASCC/ESMO Consensus Recommendations: Controlling nausea and vomiting with chemotherapy of low or minimal emetic potential",
abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this review is to update the MASCC (Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer) guidelines for controlling nausea and vomiting with chemotherapy of low or minimal emetic potential. Methods: The antiemetic study group of MASCC met in Copenhagen in 2015 to review the MASCC antiemetic guidelines. A subgroup performed a systematic literature review on antiemetics for low emetogenic chemotherapy (LEC) and chemotherapy of minimal emetic potential and the chair presented the update recommendation to the whole group for discussion. They then voted with an aim of achieving 67 {\%} or greater consensus. Results: For patients receiving low emetogenic chemotherapy, a single antiemetic such as dexamethasone, a 5HT3 receptor antagonist, or a dopamine receptor antagonist may be considered for prophylaxis of acute emesis. For patients receiving chemotherapy of minimal emetogenicity, no antiemetic should be routinely administered. If patients vomit, they should be treated as for chemotherapy of low emetic potential. No antiemetic should be administered for prevention of delayed nausea and vomiting induced by low or minimally emetogenic chemotherapy. Conclusions: More research is needed to determine the incidence of emesis, particularly delayed emesis, in the LEC group. Prospective studies are required to evaluate antiemetic strategies. The risk of emesis within LEC may be more accurately determined by adding the patient risk factors for emesis to those of the chemotherapy drugs. Improved strategies for promoting adherence to guidelines are required.",
author = "Ian Olver and Ruhlmann, {Christina H.} and Franziska Jahn and Lee Schwartzberg and Bernardo Rapoport and Rittenberg, {Cynthia N.} and Rebecca Clark-Snow",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00520-016-3391-z",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "297--301",
journal = "Supportive Care in Cancer",
issn = "0941-4355",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - 2016 Updated MASCC/ESMO Consensus Recommendations

T2 - Controlling nausea and vomiting with chemotherapy of low or minimal emetic potential

AU - Olver, Ian

AU - Ruhlmann, Christina H.

AU - Jahn, Franziska

AU - Schwartzberg, Lee

AU - Rapoport, Bernardo

AU - Rittenberg, Cynthia N.

AU - Clark-Snow, Rebecca

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Purpose: The purpose of this review is to update the MASCC (Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer) guidelines for controlling nausea and vomiting with chemotherapy of low or minimal emetic potential. Methods: The antiemetic study group of MASCC met in Copenhagen in 2015 to review the MASCC antiemetic guidelines. A subgroup performed a systematic literature review on antiemetics for low emetogenic chemotherapy (LEC) and chemotherapy of minimal emetic potential and the chair presented the update recommendation to the whole group for discussion. They then voted with an aim of achieving 67 % or greater consensus. Results: For patients receiving low emetogenic chemotherapy, a single antiemetic such as dexamethasone, a 5HT3 receptor antagonist, or a dopamine receptor antagonist may be considered for prophylaxis of acute emesis. For patients receiving chemotherapy of minimal emetogenicity, no antiemetic should be routinely administered. If patients vomit, they should be treated as for chemotherapy of low emetic potential. No antiemetic should be administered for prevention of delayed nausea and vomiting induced by low or minimally emetogenic chemotherapy. Conclusions: More research is needed to determine the incidence of emesis, particularly delayed emesis, in the LEC group. Prospective studies are required to evaluate antiemetic strategies. The risk of emesis within LEC may be more accurately determined by adding the patient risk factors for emesis to those of the chemotherapy drugs. Improved strategies for promoting adherence to guidelines are required.

AB - Purpose: The purpose of this review is to update the MASCC (Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer) guidelines for controlling nausea and vomiting with chemotherapy of low or minimal emetic potential. Methods: The antiemetic study group of MASCC met in Copenhagen in 2015 to review the MASCC antiemetic guidelines. A subgroup performed a systematic literature review on antiemetics for low emetogenic chemotherapy (LEC) and chemotherapy of minimal emetic potential and the chair presented the update recommendation to the whole group for discussion. They then voted with an aim of achieving 67 % or greater consensus. Results: For patients receiving low emetogenic chemotherapy, a single antiemetic such as dexamethasone, a 5HT3 receptor antagonist, or a dopamine receptor antagonist may be considered for prophylaxis of acute emesis. For patients receiving chemotherapy of minimal emetogenicity, no antiemetic should be routinely administered. If patients vomit, they should be treated as for chemotherapy of low emetic potential. No antiemetic should be administered for prevention of delayed nausea and vomiting induced by low or minimally emetogenic chemotherapy. Conclusions: More research is needed to determine the incidence of emesis, particularly delayed emesis, in the LEC group. Prospective studies are required to evaluate antiemetic strategies. The risk of emesis within LEC may be more accurately determined by adding the patient risk factors for emesis to those of the chemotherapy drugs. Improved strategies for promoting adherence to guidelines are required.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84984783371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84984783371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00520-016-3391-z

DO - 10.1007/s00520-016-3391-z

M3 - Article

C2 - 27572335

AN - SCOPUS:84984783371

VL - 25

SP - 297

EP - 301

JO - Supportive Care in Cancer

JF - Supportive Care in Cancer

SN - 0941-4355

IS - 1

ER -