24-Month pharmacotherapy residency

The what and how behind these programs

Sarah A. Nisly, Alex N. Isaacs, Cyle White, Shaunta' Chamberlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose To describe available 24-month pharmacotherapy residency programs. Methods Eligible residency programs were identified using the American Society of Health-System Pharmacy (ASHP) and American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) online directory of postgraduate programs. Initial information was gathered via a program description search on the World Wide Web. Following the initial search, program directors were contacted to verify current information and complete missing data. Descriptive statistics were utilized to report the data. Results Thirteen programs were identified and all programs responded. The majority of programs had multiple practice sites (n = 7; 54%) and an affiliation with a college or school of pharmacy (n = 11; 85%). Additionally, 62% (n = 8) receiving some funding for the residency program through a college or school of pharmacy. Although most programs had a primarily acute care focus, all programs required both acute care and ambulatory care experiences. Overall, 62% (n = 8) of programs offered a rotation coupling strategy. All programs required completion of a research project, allowing flexibility for a large two year project as appropriate. Academic experiences were available in all programs; however, experience was more prevalent in programs with academic funding. When combined, programs report the following average residency time allocations: 61% patient care, 15% research, 15% teaching, and 9% leadership/service. Conclusions Minimal information is available comparing 24-month pharmacotherapy programs, providing a barrier to interested students, student mentors, and potential residency program directors. While diversity exists between required and elective experiences, all offer a mix of acute and ambulatory care clinical experiences. Graduates are equipped with diverse experiences, allowing versatility in the delivery of patient care. Additionally, residents are often afforded the opportunity to participate in teaching, service, and scholarship. Utilizing knowledge of the characteristics of currently available programs may help future programs structure diverse 24-month pharmacotherapy residencies and enhance student understanding of what these programs have to offer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)796-803
Number of pages8
JournalCurrents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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Drug therapy
Internship and Residency
Students
Drug Therapy
Teaching
Pharmacy Schools
Ambulatory Care
Online Pharmaceutical Services
Patient Care
Health
Statistics
Online Systems
Directories
Mentors
Program Development
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

24-Month pharmacotherapy residency : The what and how behind these programs. / Nisly, Sarah A.; Isaacs, Alex N.; White, Cyle; Chamberlin, Shaunta'.

In: Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning, Vol. 8, No. 6, 01.11.2016, p. 796-803.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose To describe available 24-month pharmacotherapy residency programs. Methods Eligible residency programs were identified using the American Society of Health-System Pharmacy (ASHP) and American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) online directory of postgraduate programs. Initial information was gathered via a program description search on the World Wide Web. Following the initial search, program directors were contacted to verify current information and complete missing data. Descriptive statistics were utilized to report the data. Results Thirteen programs were identified and all programs responded. The majority of programs had multiple practice sites (n = 7; 54{\%}) and an affiliation with a college or school of pharmacy (n = 11; 85{\%}). Additionally, 62{\%} (n = 8) receiving some funding for the residency program through a college or school of pharmacy. Although most programs had a primarily acute care focus, all programs required both acute care and ambulatory care experiences. Overall, 62{\%} (n = 8) of programs offered a rotation coupling strategy. All programs required completion of a research project, allowing flexibility for a large two year project as appropriate. Academic experiences were available in all programs; however, experience was more prevalent in programs with academic funding. When combined, programs report the following average residency time allocations: 61{\%} patient care, 15{\%} research, 15{\%} teaching, and 9{\%} leadership/service. Conclusions Minimal information is available comparing 24-month pharmacotherapy programs, providing a barrier to interested students, student mentors, and potential residency program directors. While diversity exists between required and elective experiences, all offer a mix of acute and ambulatory care clinical experiences. Graduates are equipped with diverse experiences, allowing versatility in the delivery of patient care. Additionally, residents are often afforded the opportunity to participate in teaching, service, and scholarship. Utilizing knowledge of the characteristics of currently available programs may help future programs structure diverse 24-month pharmacotherapy residencies and enhance student understanding of what these programs have to offer.",
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