70‐Kilodalton Heat Shock Protein Induction in Cerebellar Astrocytes and Cerebellar Granule Cells In Vitro

Comparison with Immunocytochemical Localization After Hyperthermia In Vivo

Ann M. Marini, Masao Kozuka, Robert H. Lipsky, Thaddeus Nowak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

112 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract: Induction of the 70‐kDa heat shock protein, hsp70, was evaluated in cultured cerebellar astrocytes and granule cell neurons subjected to a hyperthermic stress, using a monoclonal antibody and an oligonucleotide probe that selectively recognize stress‐inducible species of hsp70‐related proteins and RNAs, respectively. Immunoblots of cultures enriched in either granule cells or astrocytes, and immunocytochemical localization studies in cocultures of these cell types, demonstrated that hsp70 induction was restricted to the astrocyte population. Amino acid incorporation experiments showed little difference in the loss and recovery of overall protein synthesis activity in these two cell types following transient hyperthermic stress. RNA blot hybridizations confirmed the preferential glial induction of hsp70. In vivo immunocytochemical studies in brains of adult rats following hyperthermia were consistent with earlier observations that suggested a primarily glial and vascular localization of the heat shock response in most brain regions, although the intense immunoreactivity in the cerebellar granule cell layer suggests that there is induction of hsp70 in these neurons under in vivo conditions. These results suggest the potential value of such defined cell cultures in identifying mechanisms responsible for differences in the heat shock response of various cell types in vitro, and in revealing factors that may account for the apparent absence of the stress response in cultured cerebellar granule cell neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1509-1516
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Heat-Shock Proteins
Astrocytes
Neurons
Fever
Brain
RNA
Oligonucleotide Probes
Heat-Shock Response
Cell culture
Rats
Neuroglia
Proteins
Monoclonal Antibodies
Cells
Amino Acids
Recovery
Coculture Techniques
In Vitro Techniques
Blood Vessels
Experiments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

70‐Kilodalton Heat Shock Protein Induction in Cerebellar Astrocytes and Cerebellar Granule Cells In Vitro : Comparison with Immunocytochemical Localization After Hyperthermia In Vivo. / Marini, Ann M.; Kozuka, Masao; Lipsky, Robert H.; Nowak, Thaddeus.

In: Journal of Neurochemistry, Vol. 54, No. 5, 01.01.1990, p. 1509-1516.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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