A Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Excessive Gestational Weight Gain

Rebecca Krukowski, Delia West, Marisha DiCarlo, Kartik Shankar, Mario A. Cleves, Eric Tedford, Aline Andres

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is a key modifiable risk factor for negative maternal and child health. We examined the efficacy of a behavioral intervention in preventing excessive GWG. Methods 230 pregnant women (87.4 % Caucasian, mean age = 29.2 years; second parity) participated in the longitudinal Glowing study (clinicaltrial.gov #NCT01131117), which included six intervention sessions focused on GWG. To determine the efficacy of the intervention in comparison to usual care, participants were compared to a matched contemporary cohort group from the Arkansas Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring Survey (PRAMS). Results Participants attended 98 % of intervention sessions. Mean GWG for the Glowing participants was 12.7 ± 2.7 kg for normal weight women, 12.4 ± 4.9 kg for overweight women, and 9.0 ± 4.2 kg for class 1 obese women. Mean GWG was significantly lower for normal weight and class 1 obese Glowing participants compared to the PRAMS respondents. Similarly, among those who gained excessively, normal weight and class 1 obese Glowing participants had a significantly smaller mean weight gain above the guidelines in comparison to PRAMS participants. There was no significant difference in the overall proportion of the Glowing participants and the proportion of matched PRAMS respondents who gained in excess of the Institute of Medicine GWG guidelines. Conclusions for Practice This behavioral intervention was well-accepted and attenuated GWG among normal weight and class 1 obese women, compared to matched participants. Nevertheless, a more intensive intervention may be necessary to help women achieve GWG within the Institute of Medicine’s guidelines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)485-491
Number of pages7
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

Weight Gain
Weights and Measures
Pregnancy
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
Guidelines
Parity
Longitudinal Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Pregnant Women

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Krukowski, R., West, D., DiCarlo, M., Shankar, K., Cleves, M. A., Tedford, E., & Andres, A. (2017). A Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Excessive Gestational Weight Gain. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 21(3), 485-491. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-016-2127-5

A Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Excessive Gestational Weight Gain. / Krukowski, Rebecca; West, Delia; DiCarlo, Marisha; Shankar, Kartik; Cleves, Mario A.; Tedford, Eric; Andres, Aline.

In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, Vol. 21, No. 3, 01.03.2017, p. 485-491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krukowski, R, West, D, DiCarlo, M, Shankar, K, Cleves, MA, Tedford, E & Andres, A 2017, 'A Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Excessive Gestational Weight Gain', Maternal and Child Health Journal, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 485-491. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-016-2127-5
Krukowski, Rebecca ; West, Delia ; DiCarlo, Marisha ; Shankar, Kartik ; Cleves, Mario A. ; Tedford, Eric ; Andres, Aline. / A Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Excessive Gestational Weight Gain. In: Maternal and Child Health Journal. 2017 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 485-491.
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