A brief-access test for bitter taste in mice

John D. Boughter, Steven J. St. John, Derek T. Noel, Obinna Ndubuizu, David V. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Inbred mouse strains vary in their response to bitter-tasting compounds as assessed by 48 h preference tests. These differences are generally assumed to result from altered gustatory function, although such long-term tests could easily reflect additional factors. We developed a brief-access taste test and tested the responses of two inbred strains, as well as C3.SW congenic mice, to the bitter stimulus sucrose octaacetate (SOA). Water-deprived trained mice were tested with five concentrations of SOA (0.00018-0.18 mM) and distilled water in a Davis MS-160 apparatus. Trials were 5 s in duration and stimuli were presented randomly within blocks; each stimulus trial was preceded by a water rinse trial. Each concentration was presented twice in a session and mice were repeatedly tested across consecutive days. SOA-taster mice, including the SWR/J (SW) inbred and C3.SW congenic taster (T) mice, avoided licking SOA at concentrations >0.003 mM. In comparison, C3HeB/FeJ (C3) and C3.SW demitaster mice (D) licked all concentrations at the same rate as water. Concentration-response functions were similar across strains for both the brief-access test and a parallel 48 h preference test run on separate groups of mice. Furthermore, concentration-response functions were similar whether or not the brief-access test was preceded by a 4 day, single concentration pretest with SOA. The brief-access test is a suitable assay for bitter taste function in mice because it minimizes possible post-ingestive influences on taste.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-142
Number of pages10
JournalChemical senses
Volume27
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 25 2002

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Water
Dysgeusia
Congenic Mice
Inbred Strains Mice
sucrose octaacetate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Boughter, J. D., St. John, S. J., Noel, D. T., Ndubuizu, O., & Smith, D. V. (2002). A brief-access test for bitter taste in mice. Chemical senses, 27(2), 133-142.

A brief-access test for bitter taste in mice. / Boughter, John D.; St. John, Steven J.; Noel, Derek T.; Ndubuizu, Obinna; Smith, David V.

In: Chemical senses, Vol. 27, No. 2, 25.03.2002, p. 133-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boughter, JD, St. John, SJ, Noel, DT, Ndubuizu, O & Smith, DV 2002, 'A brief-access test for bitter taste in mice', Chemical senses, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 133-142.
Boughter JD, St. John SJ, Noel DT, Ndubuizu O, Smith DV. A brief-access test for bitter taste in mice. Chemical senses. 2002 Mar 25;27(2):133-142.
Boughter, John D. ; St. John, Steven J. ; Noel, Derek T. ; Ndubuizu, Obinna ; Smith, David V. / A brief-access test for bitter taste in mice. In: Chemical senses. 2002 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 133-142.
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