A case of acute agitation with a negative urine drug screen

a new wave of "legal" drugs of abuse.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Substance abuse is reportedly the most common cause of patients presenting with severe agitation in the emergency department. With increased access to information, people are now trying different substances for recreational use. Clinicians dealing with these patients have an increased responsibility to be aware of these new substances being abused and their management. We report a case of a 36-year-old male who was brought to the ED with severe agitation. His laboratory results, including urine drug screen, failed to suggest any substance abuse, infection or encephalopathy. Later he was found to have ingested "bath salts," which are available for purchase in gas stations and convenience stores. The patient was treated and discharged home in stable condition. We aim to raise awareness among public and medical personnel, especially physicians, about this new substance of abuse as it is not illegal yet in many states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-32
Number of pages2
JournalTennessee medicine : journal of the Tennessee Medical Association
Volume105
Issue number9
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

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Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders
Urine
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Access to Information
Brain Diseases
Baths
Hospital Emergency Service
Salts
Gases
Physicians
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "A case of acute agitation with a negative urine drug screen: a new wave of {"}legal{"} drugs of abuse.",
abstract = "Substance abuse is reportedly the most common cause of patients presenting with severe agitation in the emergency department. With increased access to information, people are now trying different substances for recreational use. Clinicians dealing with these patients have an increased responsibility to be aware of these new substances being abused and their management. We report a case of a 36-year-old male who was brought to the ED with severe agitation. His laboratory results, including urine drug screen, failed to suggest any substance abuse, infection or encephalopathy. Later he was found to have ingested {"}bath salts,{"} which are available for purchase in gas stations and convenience stores. The patient was treated and discharged home in stable condition. We aim to raise awareness among public and medical personnel, especially physicians, about this new substance of abuse as it is not illegal yet in many states.",
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