A cephalometric assessment of children with fetal alcohol syndrome

Alka V. Gir, Korntip Aksharanugraha, Edward Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lateral cephalometric radiographs were quantitatively assessed in a series of 15 American black children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Although none was profoundly affected, FAS had been diagnosed in all the children at birth. Comparisons with age-, sex-, and race-matched controls disclosed a triad of facial profile differences: (1) frontal bossing, (2) palatal plane tipped up in the front with proclined upper incisors and a sharp nasolabial angle acquired from digit habits, and (3) above-average length of the mandibular corpus. Collectively these generate the perception of midface hypoplasia, although the midface actually is unremarkable in size and position. A high prevalence of chronic digit habits (8 of 15) is a secondary consideration in FAS, leading to localized skeletodental problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-326
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Volume95
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Cephalometry
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
Habits
Incisor
Parturition

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

A cephalometric assessment of children with fetal alcohol syndrome. / Gir, Alka V.; Aksharanugraha, Korntip; Harris, Edward.

In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Vol. 95, No. 4, 01.01.1989, p. 319-326.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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