A community-based trial of educational interventions with fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening uptake among blacks in community settings

Shannon Christy, Stacy N. Davis, Kimberly R. Williams, Xiuhua Zhao, Swapomthi K. Govindaraju, Gwendolyn P. Quinn, Susan T. Vadaparampil, Hui Yi Lin, Steven K. Sutton, Richard R. Roethzeim, David Shibata, Cathy D. Meade, Clement K. Gwede

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Intervention studies among individuals in diverse community settings are needed to reduce health disparities in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and mortality rates. The current study compared the efficacy of 2 intervention conditions promoting CRC screening among black individuals. METHODS: Black individuals ages 50 to 75 years (N = 330) were recruited in community settings in 4 Tampa Bay counties. After obtaining consent and conducting a baseline interview to assess sociodemographic and health-related variables, participants received either a culturally targeted CRC photonovella booklet plus a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kit or a standard CRC screening brochure plus an FIT kit. The primary outcome was FIT kit screening uptake. RESULTS: FIT screening uptake at 6 months was 86.7% overall (90.3% in the brochure group and 81.9% in the photonovella group). Controlling for baseline between-group differences, there was no influence of intervention on FIT kit uptake (P =.756). Significant predictors of not returning an FIT kit included being unable to work (P =.010), having higher religious belief scores (P =.015), and living farther from the cancer center (P =.015). CONCLUSIONS: Providing FIT kits and educational print materials to black individuals in community settings resulted in high rates of CRC screening. The study also identified subgroups of participants who were less likely to return an FIT kit and provides insight for future interventions. Cancer 2016;122:3288–3296.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3288-3296
Number of pages9
JournalCancer
Volume122
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2016

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Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms
Pamphlets
Health
Religion
Neoplasms
Interviews
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Christy, S., Davis, S. N., Williams, K. R., Zhao, X., Govindaraju, S. K., Quinn, G. P., ... Gwede, C. K. (2016). A community-based trial of educational interventions with fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening uptake among blacks in community settings. Cancer, 122(21), 3288-3296. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.30207

A community-based trial of educational interventions with fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening uptake among blacks in community settings. / Christy, Shannon; Davis, Stacy N.; Williams, Kimberly R.; Zhao, Xiuhua; Govindaraju, Swapomthi K.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Lin, Hui Yi; Sutton, Steven K.; Roethzeim, Richard R.; Shibata, David; Meade, Cathy D.; Gwede, Clement K.

In: Cancer, Vol. 122, No. 21, 15.11.2016, p. 3288-3296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Christy, S, Davis, SN, Williams, KR, Zhao, X, Govindaraju, SK, Quinn, GP, Vadaparampil, ST, Lin, HY, Sutton, SK, Roethzeim, RR, Shibata, D, Meade, CD & Gwede, CK 2016, 'A community-based trial of educational interventions with fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening uptake among blacks in community settings', Cancer, vol. 122, no. 21, pp. 3288-3296. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.30207
Christy, Shannon ; Davis, Stacy N. ; Williams, Kimberly R. ; Zhao, Xiuhua ; Govindaraju, Swapomthi K. ; Quinn, Gwendolyn P. ; Vadaparampil, Susan T. ; Lin, Hui Yi ; Sutton, Steven K. ; Roethzeim, Richard R. ; Shibata, David ; Meade, Cathy D. ; Gwede, Clement K. / A community-based trial of educational interventions with fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening uptake among blacks in community settings. In: Cancer. 2016 ; Vol. 122, No. 21. pp. 3288-3296.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Intervention studies among individuals in diverse community settings are needed to reduce health disparities in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and mortality rates. The current study compared the efficacy of 2 intervention conditions promoting CRC screening among black individuals. METHODS: Black individuals ages 50 to 75 years (N = 330) were recruited in community settings in 4 Tampa Bay counties. After obtaining consent and conducting a baseline interview to assess sociodemographic and health-related variables, participants received either a culturally targeted CRC photonovella booklet plus a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kit or a standard CRC screening brochure plus an FIT kit. The primary outcome was FIT kit screening uptake. RESULTS: FIT screening uptake at 6 months was 86.7{\%} overall (90.3{\%} in the brochure group and 81.9{\%} in the photonovella group). Controlling for baseline between-group differences, there was no influence of intervention on FIT kit uptake (P =.756). Significant predictors of not returning an FIT kit included being unable to work (P =.010), having higher religious belief scores (P =.015), and living farther from the cancer center (P =.015). CONCLUSIONS: Providing FIT kits and educational print materials to black individuals in community settings resulted in high rates of CRC screening. The study also identified subgroups of participants who were less likely to return an FIT kit and provides insight for future interventions. Cancer 2016;122:3288–3296.",
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AU - Govindaraju, Swapomthi K.

AU - Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

AU - Vadaparampil, Susan T.

AU - Lin, Hui Yi

AU - Sutton, Steven K.

AU - Roethzeim, Richard R.

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Intervention studies among individuals in diverse community settings are needed to reduce health disparities in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and mortality rates. The current study compared the efficacy of 2 intervention conditions promoting CRC screening among black individuals. METHODS: Black individuals ages 50 to 75 years (N = 330) were recruited in community settings in 4 Tampa Bay counties. After obtaining consent and conducting a baseline interview to assess sociodemographic and health-related variables, participants received either a culturally targeted CRC photonovella booklet plus a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kit or a standard CRC screening brochure plus an FIT kit. The primary outcome was FIT kit screening uptake. RESULTS: FIT screening uptake at 6 months was 86.7% overall (90.3% in the brochure group and 81.9% in the photonovella group). Controlling for baseline between-group differences, there was no influence of intervention on FIT kit uptake (P =.756). Significant predictors of not returning an FIT kit included being unable to work (P =.010), having higher religious belief scores (P =.015), and living farther from the cancer center (P =.015). CONCLUSIONS: Providing FIT kits and educational print materials to black individuals in community settings resulted in high rates of CRC screening. The study also identified subgroups of participants who were less likely to return an FIT kit and provides insight for future interventions. Cancer 2016;122:3288–3296.

AB - BACKGROUND: Intervention studies among individuals in diverse community settings are needed to reduce health disparities in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and mortality rates. The current study compared the efficacy of 2 intervention conditions promoting CRC screening among black individuals. METHODS: Black individuals ages 50 to 75 years (N = 330) were recruited in community settings in 4 Tampa Bay counties. After obtaining consent and conducting a baseline interview to assess sociodemographic and health-related variables, participants received either a culturally targeted CRC photonovella booklet plus a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kit or a standard CRC screening brochure plus an FIT kit. The primary outcome was FIT kit screening uptake. RESULTS: FIT screening uptake at 6 months was 86.7% overall (90.3% in the brochure group and 81.9% in the photonovella group). Controlling for baseline between-group differences, there was no influence of intervention on FIT kit uptake (P =.756). Significant predictors of not returning an FIT kit included being unable to work (P =.010), having higher religious belief scores (P =.015), and living farther from the cancer center (P =.015). CONCLUSIONS: Providing FIT kits and educational print materials to black individuals in community settings resulted in high rates of CRC screening. The study also identified subgroups of participants who were less likely to return an FIT kit and provides insight for future interventions. Cancer 2016;122:3288–3296.

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