A dance intervention for cancer survivors and their partners (RHYTHM)

Maria Pisu, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Kelly M. Kenzik, Robert A. Oster, Chee Paul Lin, Sharon Manne, Ronald Alvarez, Michelle Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of a ballroom dance intervention on improving quality of life (QOL) and relationship outcomes in cancer survivors and their partners. Methods: We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial with two arms (Restoring Health in You (and Your Partner) through Movement, RHYTHM): (1) immediate dance intervention and (2) delayed intervention (wait-list control). The intervention consisted of 10 private weekly dance lessons and 2 practice parties over 12 weeks. Main outcomes were physical activity (Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire), functional capacity (6 Minute Walk Test), QOL (SF-36), Couples’ trust (Dyadic Trust Scale), and other dyadic outcomes. Exit interviews were completed by all participating couples. Results: Thirty-one women survivors (68% breast cancer) and their partners participated. Survivors were 57.9 years old on average and 22.6% African American. Partners had similar characteristics. RHYTHM had significant positive effects on physical activity (p = 0.05), on the mental component of QOL (p = 0.04), on vitality (p = 0.03), and on the dyadic trust scale (p = 0.04). Couples expressed satisfaction with the intervention including appreciating the opportunity to spend time and exercise together. Survivors saw this light-intensity physical activity as easing them into becoming more physically active. Conclusions: Light intensity ballroom dancing has the potential to improve cancer survivors’ QOL. Larger trials are needed to build strong support for this ubiquitous and acceptable activity. Implications for cancer survivors: Ballroom dance may be an important tool for cancer survivors to return to a physically active life and improve QOL and other aspects of their intimate life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)350-359
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Cancer Survivorship
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Dancing
Survivors
Quality of Life
Exercise
Neoplasms
Light
Leisure Activities
African Americans
Randomized Controlled Trials
Interviews
Breast Neoplasms
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

Pisu, M., Demark-Wahnefried, W., Kenzik, K. M., Oster, R. A., Lin, C. P., Manne, S., ... Martin, M. (2017). A dance intervention for cancer survivors and their partners (RHYTHM). Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 11(3), 350-359. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11764-016-0593-9

A dance intervention for cancer survivors and their partners (RHYTHM). / Pisu, Maria; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Kenzik, Kelly M.; Oster, Robert A.; Lin, Chee Paul; Manne, Sharon; Alvarez, Ronald; Martin, Michelle.

In: Journal of Cancer Survivorship, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.06.2017, p. 350-359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pisu, M, Demark-Wahnefried, W, Kenzik, KM, Oster, RA, Lin, CP, Manne, S, Alvarez, R & Martin, M 2017, 'A dance intervention for cancer survivors and their partners (RHYTHM)', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 350-359. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11764-016-0593-9
Pisu M, Demark-Wahnefried W, Kenzik KM, Oster RA, Lin CP, Manne S et al. A dance intervention for cancer survivors and their partners (RHYTHM). Journal of Cancer Survivorship. 2017 Jun 1;11(3):350-359. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11764-016-0593-9
Pisu, Maria ; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy ; Kenzik, Kelly M. ; Oster, Robert A. ; Lin, Chee Paul ; Manne, Sharon ; Alvarez, Ronald ; Martin, Michelle. / A dance intervention for cancer survivors and their partners (RHYTHM). In: Journal of Cancer Survivorship. 2017 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 350-359.
@article{eda754bb22744acd88fd2f923b22a142,
title = "A dance intervention for cancer survivors and their partners (RHYTHM)",
abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of a ballroom dance intervention on improving quality of life (QOL) and relationship outcomes in cancer survivors and their partners. Methods: We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial with two arms (Restoring Health in You (and Your Partner) through Movement, RHYTHM): (1) immediate dance intervention and (2) delayed intervention (wait-list control). The intervention consisted of 10 private weekly dance lessons and 2 practice parties over 12 weeks. Main outcomes were physical activity (Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire), functional capacity (6 Minute Walk Test), QOL (SF-36), Couples’ trust (Dyadic Trust Scale), and other dyadic outcomes. Exit interviews were completed by all participating couples. Results: Thirty-one women survivors (68{\%} breast cancer) and their partners participated. Survivors were 57.9 years old on average and 22.6{\%} African American. Partners had similar characteristics. RHYTHM had significant positive effects on physical activity (p = 0.05), on the mental component of QOL (p = 0.04), on vitality (p = 0.03), and on the dyadic trust scale (p = 0.04). Couples expressed satisfaction with the intervention including appreciating the opportunity to spend time and exercise together. Survivors saw this light-intensity physical activity as easing them into becoming more physically active. Conclusions: Light intensity ballroom dancing has the potential to improve cancer survivors’ QOL. Larger trials are needed to build strong support for this ubiquitous and acceptable activity. Implications for cancer survivors: Ballroom dance may be an important tool for cancer survivors to return to a physically active life and improve QOL and other aspects of their intimate life.",
author = "Maria Pisu and Wendy Demark-Wahnefried and Kenzik, {Kelly M.} and Oster, {Robert A.} and Lin, {Chee Paul} and Sharon Manne and Ronald Alvarez and Michelle Martin",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11764-016-0593-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "350--359",
journal = "Journal of Cancer Survivorship",
issn = "1932-2259",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A dance intervention for cancer survivors and their partners (RHYTHM)

AU - Pisu, Maria

AU - Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

AU - Kenzik, Kelly M.

AU - Oster, Robert A.

AU - Lin, Chee Paul

AU - Manne, Sharon

AU - Alvarez, Ronald

AU - Martin, Michelle

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

N2 - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of a ballroom dance intervention on improving quality of life (QOL) and relationship outcomes in cancer survivors and their partners. Methods: We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial with two arms (Restoring Health in You (and Your Partner) through Movement, RHYTHM): (1) immediate dance intervention and (2) delayed intervention (wait-list control). The intervention consisted of 10 private weekly dance lessons and 2 practice parties over 12 weeks. Main outcomes were physical activity (Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire), functional capacity (6 Minute Walk Test), QOL (SF-36), Couples’ trust (Dyadic Trust Scale), and other dyadic outcomes. Exit interviews were completed by all participating couples. Results: Thirty-one women survivors (68% breast cancer) and their partners participated. Survivors were 57.9 years old on average and 22.6% African American. Partners had similar characteristics. RHYTHM had significant positive effects on physical activity (p = 0.05), on the mental component of QOL (p = 0.04), on vitality (p = 0.03), and on the dyadic trust scale (p = 0.04). Couples expressed satisfaction with the intervention including appreciating the opportunity to spend time and exercise together. Survivors saw this light-intensity physical activity as easing them into becoming more physically active. Conclusions: Light intensity ballroom dancing has the potential to improve cancer survivors’ QOL. Larger trials are needed to build strong support for this ubiquitous and acceptable activity. Implications for cancer survivors: Ballroom dance may be an important tool for cancer survivors to return to a physically active life and improve QOL and other aspects of their intimate life.

AB - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of a ballroom dance intervention on improving quality of life (QOL) and relationship outcomes in cancer survivors and their partners. Methods: We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial with two arms (Restoring Health in You (and Your Partner) through Movement, RHYTHM): (1) immediate dance intervention and (2) delayed intervention (wait-list control). The intervention consisted of 10 private weekly dance lessons and 2 practice parties over 12 weeks. Main outcomes were physical activity (Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire), functional capacity (6 Minute Walk Test), QOL (SF-36), Couples’ trust (Dyadic Trust Scale), and other dyadic outcomes. Exit interviews were completed by all participating couples. Results: Thirty-one women survivors (68% breast cancer) and their partners participated. Survivors were 57.9 years old on average and 22.6% African American. Partners had similar characteristics. RHYTHM had significant positive effects on physical activity (p = 0.05), on the mental component of QOL (p = 0.04), on vitality (p = 0.03), and on the dyadic trust scale (p = 0.04). Couples expressed satisfaction with the intervention including appreciating the opportunity to spend time and exercise together. Survivors saw this light-intensity physical activity as easing them into becoming more physically active. Conclusions: Light intensity ballroom dancing has the potential to improve cancer survivors’ QOL. Larger trials are needed to build strong support for this ubiquitous and acceptable activity. Implications for cancer survivors: Ballroom dance may be an important tool for cancer survivors to return to a physically active life and improve QOL and other aspects of their intimate life.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85008600455&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85008600455&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11764-016-0593-9

DO - 10.1007/s11764-016-0593-9

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 350

EP - 359

JO - Journal of Cancer Survivorship

JF - Journal of Cancer Survivorship

SN - 1932-2259

IS - 3

ER -