A first-tier rapid assay for the serodiagnosis of Borrelia burgdorferi infection

Maria Gomes-Solecki, Gary P. Wormser, David H. Persing, Bernard W. Berger, John D. Glass, Xiaohua Yang, Raymond J. Dattwyler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The present recommendation for the serologic diagnosis of Lyme disease is a 2-tier process in which a serum sample with a positive or equivocal result by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or immunofluorescent assay is then followed by supplemental testing by Western blot. Our laboratory has developed recombinant chimeric proteins composed of key Borrelia epitopes. These novel antigens are consistent and are easily standardized. Methods: We adapted these recombinant proteins into a new immunochromatographic format that can be used as a highly sensitive and specific first-tier assay that can be used to replace the ELISA or immunofluorescent assay. Results: This rapid test was equally sensitive (P>.05) and more specific (P<.05) than a frequently used commercial whole cell ELISA. The overall clinical accuracy achieved on agreement studies among 3 Lyme research laboratories on clinically defined serum panels was shown to be statistically equivalent to the commercial ELISA. The assay can detect anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in either serum or whole blood. Conclusion: This sensitive and specific rapid assay, which is suited for the physician's office, streamlines the 2-tier system by allowing the physician to determine if a Western blot is necessary at the time of the initial office visit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2015-2020
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume161
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 10 2001

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Borrelia Infections
Borrelia burgdorferi
Serologic Tests
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Western Blotting
Serum
Recombinant Fusion Proteins
Borrelia
Office Visits
Physicians' Offices
Lyme Disease
Recombinant Proteins
Epitopes
Physicians
Antigens
Antibodies
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Gomes-Solecki, M., Wormser, G. P., Persing, D. H., Berger, B. W., Glass, J. D., Yang, X., & Dattwyler, R. J. (2001). A first-tier rapid assay for the serodiagnosis of Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Archives of Internal Medicine, 161(16), 2015-2020. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.161.16.2015

A first-tier rapid assay for the serodiagnosis of Borrelia burgdorferi infection. / Gomes-Solecki, Maria; Wormser, Gary P.; Persing, David H.; Berger, Bernard W.; Glass, John D.; Yang, Xiaohua; Dattwyler, Raymond J.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 161, No. 16, 10.09.2001, p. 2015-2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gomes-Solecki, M, Wormser, GP, Persing, DH, Berger, BW, Glass, JD, Yang, X & Dattwyler, RJ 2001, 'A first-tier rapid assay for the serodiagnosis of Borrelia burgdorferi infection', Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 161, no. 16, pp. 2015-2020. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.161.16.2015
Gomes-Solecki, Maria ; Wormser, Gary P. ; Persing, David H. ; Berger, Bernard W. ; Glass, John D. ; Yang, Xiaohua ; Dattwyler, Raymond J. / A first-tier rapid assay for the serodiagnosis of Borrelia burgdorferi infection. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 161, No. 16. pp. 2015-2020.
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