A longitudinal cephalometric study of postorthodontic craniofacial changes.

Edward Harris, R. Z. Gardner, J. L. Vaden

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16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the orthodontist focuses great efforts on diagnosis and treatment of the patient, less attention is paid to posttreatment changes that occur because of relapse and continued growth, especially over the long term. This cephalometric study describes 36 patients who were recalled x = 5.5 years after treatment and again x = 14.4 years after treatment. Most linear dimensions increased significantly from the end of treatment to first recall (ca. 16 to 21 years), presumably as a result of continued adolescent growth, but few changes achieved significance thereafter (ca. 21 to 30 years). Arch relationships (eg, ANB, NAP, AOBO, Y-axis) continued to improve after treatment, probably as a result of late growth of the mandible producing a more orthognathic profile. There was little change from first to second recall in any of the variables. Results suggest that if relapse occurs, it is likely to be evident soon after treatment and diminish thereafter and that continued craniofacial growth generally augments the orthodontic correction.

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Cephalometry
Longitudinal Studies
Growth
Therapeutics
Recurrence
Orthodontics
Mandible

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

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abstract = "Although the orthodontist focuses great efforts on diagnosis and treatment of the patient, less attention is paid to posttreatment changes that occur because of relapse and continued growth, especially over the long term. This cephalometric study describes 36 patients who were recalled x = 5.5 years after treatment and again x = 14.4 years after treatment. Most linear dimensions increased significantly from the end of treatment to first recall (ca. 16 to 21 years), presumably as a result of continued adolescent growth, but few changes achieved significance thereafter (ca. 21 to 30 years). Arch relationships (eg, ANB, NAP, AOBO, Y-axis) continued to improve after treatment, probably as a result of late growth of the mandible producing a more orthognathic profile. There was little change from first to second recall in any of the variables. Results suggest that if relapse occurs, it is likely to be evident soon after treatment and diminish thereafter and that continued craniofacial growth generally augments the orthodontic correction.",
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N2 - Although the orthodontist focuses great efforts on diagnosis and treatment of the patient, less attention is paid to posttreatment changes that occur because of relapse and continued growth, especially over the long term. This cephalometric study describes 36 patients who were recalled x = 5.5 years after treatment and again x = 14.4 years after treatment. Most linear dimensions increased significantly from the end of treatment to first recall (ca. 16 to 21 years), presumably as a result of continued adolescent growth, but few changes achieved significance thereafter (ca. 21 to 30 years). Arch relationships (eg, ANB, NAP, AOBO, Y-axis) continued to improve after treatment, probably as a result of late growth of the mandible producing a more orthognathic profile. There was little change from first to second recall in any of the variables. Results suggest that if relapse occurs, it is likely to be evident soon after treatment and diminish thereafter and that continued craniofacial growth generally augments the orthodontic correction.

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