A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage

Jessica Hines-Beard, Jeffrey Marchetta, Sarah Gordon, Edward Chaum, Eldon E. Geisert, Tonia S. Rex

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We developed and characterized a mouse model of primary ocular blast injury. The device consists of: a pressurized air tank attached to a regulated paintball gun with a machined barrel; a chamber that protects the mouse from direct injury and recoil, while exposing the eye; and a secure platform that enables fine, controlled movement of the chamber in relation to the barrel. Expected pressures were calculated and the optimal pressure transducer, based on the predicted pressures, was positioned to measure output pressures at the location where the mouse eye would be placed. Mice were exposed to one of three blast pressures (23.6, 26.4, or 30.4 psi). Gross pathology, intraocular pressure, optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity were assessed 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after exposure. Contralateral eyes and non-blast exposed mice were used as controls. We detected increased damage with increased pressures and a shift in the damage profile over time. Gross pathology included corneal edema, corneal abrasions, and optic nerve avulsion. Retinal damage was detected by optical coherence tomography and a deficit in visual acuity was detected by optokinetics. Our findings are comparable to those identified in Veterans of the recent wars with closed eye injuries as a result of blast exposure. In summary, this is a relatively simple system that creates injuries with features similar to those seen in patients with ocular blast trauma. This is an important new model for testing the short-term and long-term spectrum of closed globe blast injuries and potential therapeutic interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-70
Number of pages8
JournalExperimental Eye Research
Volume99
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

Fingerprint

Blast Injuries
Eye Injuries
Pressure
Optical Coherence Tomography
Visual Acuity
Wounds and Injuries
Compressed Air
Optic Nerve Injuries
Pathology
Corneal Edema
Pressure Transducers
Firearms
Veterans
Intraocular Pressure
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Hines-Beard, J., Marchetta, J., Gordon, S., Chaum, E., Geisert, E. E., & Rex, T. S. (2012). A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage. Experimental Eye Research, 99(1), 63-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exer.2012.03.013

A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage. / Hines-Beard, Jessica; Marchetta, Jeffrey; Gordon, Sarah; Chaum, Edward; Geisert, Eldon E.; Rex, Tonia S.

In: Experimental Eye Research, Vol. 99, No. 1, 01.06.2012, p. 63-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hines-Beard, J, Marchetta, J, Gordon, S, Chaum, E, Geisert, EE & Rex, TS 2012, 'A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage', Experimental Eye Research, vol. 99, no. 1, pp. 63-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exer.2012.03.013
Hines-Beard, Jessica ; Marchetta, Jeffrey ; Gordon, Sarah ; Chaum, Edward ; Geisert, Eldon E. ; Rex, Tonia S. / A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage. In: Experimental Eye Research. 2012 ; Vol. 99, No. 1. pp. 63-70.
@article{b213d90821cb4155ad514cb97a947efe,
title = "A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage",
abstract = "We developed and characterized a mouse model of primary ocular blast injury. The device consists of: a pressurized air tank attached to a regulated paintball gun with a machined barrel; a chamber that protects the mouse from direct injury and recoil, while exposing the eye; and a secure platform that enables fine, controlled movement of the chamber in relation to the barrel. Expected pressures were calculated and the optimal pressure transducer, based on the predicted pressures, was positioned to measure output pressures at the location where the mouse eye would be placed. Mice were exposed to one of three blast pressures (23.6, 26.4, or 30.4 psi). Gross pathology, intraocular pressure, optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity were assessed 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after exposure. Contralateral eyes and non-blast exposed mice were used as controls. We detected increased damage with increased pressures and a shift in the damage profile over time. Gross pathology included corneal edema, corneal abrasions, and optic nerve avulsion. Retinal damage was detected by optical coherence tomography and a deficit in visual acuity was detected by optokinetics. Our findings are comparable to those identified in Veterans of the recent wars with closed eye injuries as a result of blast exposure. In summary, this is a relatively simple system that creates injuries with features similar to those seen in patients with ocular blast trauma. This is an important new model for testing the short-term and long-term spectrum of closed globe blast injuries and potential therapeutic interventions.",
author = "Jessica Hines-Beard and Jeffrey Marchetta and Sarah Gordon and Edward Chaum and Geisert, {Eldon E.} and Rex, {Tonia S.}",
year = "2012",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.exer.2012.03.013",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "99",
pages = "63--70",
journal = "Experimental Eye Research",
issn = "0014-4835",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage

AU - Hines-Beard, Jessica

AU - Marchetta, Jeffrey

AU - Gordon, Sarah

AU - Chaum, Edward

AU - Geisert, Eldon E.

AU - Rex, Tonia S.

PY - 2012/6/1

Y1 - 2012/6/1

N2 - We developed and characterized a mouse model of primary ocular blast injury. The device consists of: a pressurized air tank attached to a regulated paintball gun with a machined barrel; a chamber that protects the mouse from direct injury and recoil, while exposing the eye; and a secure platform that enables fine, controlled movement of the chamber in relation to the barrel. Expected pressures were calculated and the optimal pressure transducer, based on the predicted pressures, was positioned to measure output pressures at the location where the mouse eye would be placed. Mice were exposed to one of three blast pressures (23.6, 26.4, or 30.4 psi). Gross pathology, intraocular pressure, optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity were assessed 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after exposure. Contralateral eyes and non-blast exposed mice were used as controls. We detected increased damage with increased pressures and a shift in the damage profile over time. Gross pathology included corneal edema, corneal abrasions, and optic nerve avulsion. Retinal damage was detected by optical coherence tomography and a deficit in visual acuity was detected by optokinetics. Our findings are comparable to those identified in Veterans of the recent wars with closed eye injuries as a result of blast exposure. In summary, this is a relatively simple system that creates injuries with features similar to those seen in patients with ocular blast trauma. This is an important new model for testing the short-term and long-term spectrum of closed globe blast injuries and potential therapeutic interventions.

AB - We developed and characterized a mouse model of primary ocular blast injury. The device consists of: a pressurized air tank attached to a regulated paintball gun with a machined barrel; a chamber that protects the mouse from direct injury and recoil, while exposing the eye; and a secure platform that enables fine, controlled movement of the chamber in relation to the barrel. Expected pressures were calculated and the optimal pressure transducer, based on the predicted pressures, was positioned to measure output pressures at the location where the mouse eye would be placed. Mice were exposed to one of three blast pressures (23.6, 26.4, or 30.4 psi). Gross pathology, intraocular pressure, optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity were assessed 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after exposure. Contralateral eyes and non-blast exposed mice were used as controls. We detected increased damage with increased pressures and a shift in the damage profile over time. Gross pathology included corneal edema, corneal abrasions, and optic nerve avulsion. Retinal damage was detected by optical coherence tomography and a deficit in visual acuity was detected by optokinetics. Our findings are comparable to those identified in Veterans of the recent wars with closed eye injuries as a result of blast exposure. In summary, this is a relatively simple system that creates injuries with features similar to those seen in patients with ocular blast trauma. This is an important new model for testing the short-term and long-term spectrum of closed globe blast injuries and potential therapeutic interventions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861653124&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84861653124&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.exer.2012.03.013

DO - 10.1016/j.exer.2012.03.013

M3 - Article

C2 - 22504073

AN - SCOPUS:84861653124

VL - 99

SP - 63

EP - 70

JO - Experimental Eye Research

JF - Experimental Eye Research

SN - 0014-4835

IS - 1

ER -