A novel role for calcium/calmodulin kinase II within the brainstem pedunculopontine tegmentum for the regulation of wakefulness and rapid eye movement sleep

Edward C. Stack, Frank Desarnaud, Donald F. Siwek, Subimal Datta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Considerable evidence suggests that the brainstem pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) neurons are critically involved in the regulation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and wakefulness (W); however, the molecular mechanisms operating within the PPT to regulate these two behavioral states remain relatively unknown. Here we demonstrate that the levels of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) and phosphorylated CaMKII expression in the PPT decreased and increased with 'low W with high REM sleep' and 'high W/low REM sleep' periods, respectively. These state-specific expression changes were not observed in the cortex, or in the immediately adjacent medial pontine reticular formation. Next, we demonstrate that CaMKII activity in the PPT is negatively and positively correlated with the 'low W with high REM sleep' and 'high W/low REM sleep' periods, respectively. These differences in correlations were not seen in the medial pontine reticular formation CaMKII activity. Finally, we demonstrate that with increased PPT CaMKII activity observed during high W/low REM sleep, there were marked shifts in the expression of genes that are involved in components of various signal transduction pathways. Collectively, these results for the first time suggest that the increased CaMKII activity within PPT neurons is associated with increased W at the expense of REM sleep, and this process is accomplished through the activation of a specific gene expression profile.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)271-281
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume112
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases
Eye movements
Wakefulness
REM Sleep
Brain Stem
Sleep
Calcium
Neurons
Signal transduction
Transcriptome
Gene expression
Signal Transduction
Genes
Chemical activation
Gene Expression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

A novel role for calcium/calmodulin kinase II within the brainstem pedunculopontine tegmentum for the regulation of wakefulness and rapid eye movement sleep. / Stack, Edward C.; Desarnaud, Frank; Siwek, Donald F.; Datta, Subimal.

In: Journal of Neurochemistry, Vol. 112, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 271-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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