A nursing home rotation in a family practice residency

J. B. Moon, L. E. Davis, J. A. Eaddy, G. E. Shacklett, M Stockton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A nursing home rotation can be a complementary component of geriatrics education in a family practice residency curriculum. Using nursing homes in teaching geriatrics has been done for some time but has of late received more emphasis. This increasing emphasis has been brought about by the growing health care needs of an aging population and a concomitant focus on education in geriatrics. If implementation of a nursing home rotation is contemplated, both the positive and negative aspects of such action as it relates to the residents, the nursing home, and the nursing home patients should be explored. The rotation as incorporated into the geriatrics curriculum of the Family Practice Residency, Knoxville Unit, University of Tennessee College of Medicine, involves all second-year and third-year residents in the medical care for patients of a 222-bed long-term care facility. From an educational standpoint, overall evaluation of the rotation reflects satisfaction. The experience exemplifies personal and comprehensive continuity of patient care. Other educational benefits include desensitization to the nursing home environment, understanding the kinds of medical care that can be delivered in this setting, and appreciation for the cost not only to the patient and the family but also the medical care system as well.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)594-598
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Family Practice
Volume30
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Family Practice
Internship and Residency
Nursing Homes
Geriatrics
Curriculum
Home Nursing
Education
Continuity of Patient Care
Long-Term Care
Patient Care
Teaching
Medicine
Delivery of Health Care
Costs and Cost Analysis
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Moon, J. B., Davis, L. E., Eaddy, J. A., Shacklett, G. E., & Stockton, M. (1990). A nursing home rotation in a family practice residency. Journal of Family Practice, 30(5), 594-598.

A nursing home rotation in a family practice residency. / Moon, J. B.; Davis, L. E.; Eaddy, J. A.; Shacklett, G. E.; Stockton, M.

In: Journal of Family Practice, Vol. 30, No. 5, 1990, p. 594-598.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moon, JB, Davis, LE, Eaddy, JA, Shacklett, GE & Stockton, M 1990, 'A nursing home rotation in a family practice residency', Journal of Family Practice, vol. 30, no. 5, pp. 594-598.
Moon JB, Davis LE, Eaddy JA, Shacklett GE, Stockton M. A nursing home rotation in a family practice residency. Journal of Family Practice. 1990;30(5):594-598.
Moon, J. B. ; Davis, L. E. ; Eaddy, J. A. ; Shacklett, G. E. ; Stockton, M. / A nursing home rotation in a family practice residency. In: Journal of Family Practice. 1990 ; Vol. 30, No. 5. pp. 594-598.
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