A paradigm shift in endodontic management of immature teeth: Conservation of stem cells for regeneration

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

100 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This article will review the new concept of regenerative endodontics in the management of immature permanent teeth. The potential role of stem cells to regenerate immature permanent teeth after conservative treatment will be discussed. Data and sources: Two sets of data source are focused in this review: (i) the characterization of various dental stem cells discovered since 2000 and (ii) recent clinical case reports showing that after conservative treatment, severely infected immature teeth with periradicular periodontitis and abscess can undergo healing and apexogenesis or maturogenesis. Results: A new protocol of treating endodontically involved immature permanent teeth based on published articles to date is summarized in the review. The key procedures of the protocol are (1) minimal or no instrumentation of the canal while relying on a gentle but thorough irrigation of the canal system, (2) the disinfection is augmented with intra-canal medication of a triple-antibiotic paste between appointments, and (3) the treated tooth is sealed with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and glass ionomer/resin cement at the completion of the treatment. Periodical follow-ups will take place to observe any continued maturation of the root. Conclusion: While more clinical research is needed, regenerative endodontics promotes a paradigm shift in treating endodontically involved immature permanent teeth from performing apexification procedures to conserving any dental stem cells that might remain in the disinfected viable tissues to allow tissue regeneration and repair to achieve apexogenesis/maturogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)379-386
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Dentistry
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Endodontics
Regeneration
Tooth
Stem Cells
Apexification
Information Storage and Retrieval
Resin Cements
Glass Ionomer Cements
Periodontitis
Disinfection
Ointments
Abscess
Appointments and Schedules
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

A paradigm shift in endodontic management of immature teeth : Conservation of stem cells for regeneration. / Huang, George.

In: Journal of Dentistry, Vol. 36, No. 6, 01.06.2008, p. 379-386.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{b0a9beb3e6604ed0b3d0c15d3db9245e,
title = "A paradigm shift in endodontic management of immature teeth: Conservation of stem cells for regeneration",
abstract = "Objective: This article will review the new concept of regenerative endodontics in the management of immature permanent teeth. The potential role of stem cells to regenerate immature permanent teeth after conservative treatment will be discussed. Data and sources: Two sets of data source are focused in this review: (i) the characterization of various dental stem cells discovered since 2000 and (ii) recent clinical case reports showing that after conservative treatment, severely infected immature teeth with periradicular periodontitis and abscess can undergo healing and apexogenesis or maturogenesis. Results: A new protocol of treating endodontically involved immature permanent teeth based on published articles to date is summarized in the review. The key procedures of the protocol are (1) minimal or no instrumentation of the canal while relying on a gentle but thorough irrigation of the canal system, (2) the disinfection is augmented with intra-canal medication of a triple-antibiotic paste between appointments, and (3) the treated tooth is sealed with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and glass ionomer/resin cement at the completion of the treatment. Periodical follow-ups will take place to observe any continued maturation of the root. Conclusion: While more clinical research is needed, regenerative endodontics promotes a paradigm shift in treating endodontically involved immature permanent teeth from performing apexification procedures to conserving any dental stem cells that might remain in the disinfected viable tissues to allow tissue regeneration and repair to achieve apexogenesis/maturogenesis.",
author = "George Huang",
year = "2008",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jdent.2008.03.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "379--386",
journal = "Journal of Dentistry",
issn = "0300-5712",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A paradigm shift in endodontic management of immature teeth

T2 - Conservation of stem cells for regeneration

AU - Huang, George

PY - 2008/6/1

Y1 - 2008/6/1

N2 - Objective: This article will review the new concept of regenerative endodontics in the management of immature permanent teeth. The potential role of stem cells to regenerate immature permanent teeth after conservative treatment will be discussed. Data and sources: Two sets of data source are focused in this review: (i) the characterization of various dental stem cells discovered since 2000 and (ii) recent clinical case reports showing that after conservative treatment, severely infected immature teeth with periradicular periodontitis and abscess can undergo healing and apexogenesis or maturogenesis. Results: A new protocol of treating endodontically involved immature permanent teeth based on published articles to date is summarized in the review. The key procedures of the protocol are (1) minimal or no instrumentation of the canal while relying on a gentle but thorough irrigation of the canal system, (2) the disinfection is augmented with intra-canal medication of a triple-antibiotic paste between appointments, and (3) the treated tooth is sealed with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and glass ionomer/resin cement at the completion of the treatment. Periodical follow-ups will take place to observe any continued maturation of the root. Conclusion: While more clinical research is needed, regenerative endodontics promotes a paradigm shift in treating endodontically involved immature permanent teeth from performing apexification procedures to conserving any dental stem cells that might remain in the disinfected viable tissues to allow tissue regeneration and repair to achieve apexogenesis/maturogenesis.

AB - Objective: This article will review the new concept of regenerative endodontics in the management of immature permanent teeth. The potential role of stem cells to regenerate immature permanent teeth after conservative treatment will be discussed. Data and sources: Two sets of data source are focused in this review: (i) the characterization of various dental stem cells discovered since 2000 and (ii) recent clinical case reports showing that after conservative treatment, severely infected immature teeth with periradicular periodontitis and abscess can undergo healing and apexogenesis or maturogenesis. Results: A new protocol of treating endodontically involved immature permanent teeth based on published articles to date is summarized in the review. The key procedures of the protocol are (1) minimal or no instrumentation of the canal while relying on a gentle but thorough irrigation of the canal system, (2) the disinfection is augmented with intra-canal medication of a triple-antibiotic paste between appointments, and (3) the treated tooth is sealed with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and glass ionomer/resin cement at the completion of the treatment. Periodical follow-ups will take place to observe any continued maturation of the root. Conclusion: While more clinical research is needed, regenerative endodontics promotes a paradigm shift in treating endodontically involved immature permanent teeth from performing apexification procedures to conserving any dental stem cells that might remain in the disinfected viable tissues to allow tissue regeneration and repair to achieve apexogenesis/maturogenesis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=43049161138&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=43049161138&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jdent.2008.03.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jdent.2008.03.002

M3 - Review article

C2 - 18420332

AN - SCOPUS:43049161138

VL - 36

SP - 379

EP - 386

JO - Journal of Dentistry

JF - Journal of Dentistry

SN - 0300-5712

IS - 6

ER -