A prospective study evaluating the clinical relevance of a chemoresponse assay for treatment of patients with persistent or recurrent ovarian cancer

Thomas Rutherford, James Orr, Edward Grendys, Robert Edwards, Thomas C. Krivak, Robert Holloway, Richard G. Moore, Larry Puls, Todd Tillmanns, Julian C. Schink, Stacey L. Brower, Chunqiao Tian, Thomas J. Herzog

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Use of in vitro chemoresponse assays for informing effective treatment selection is a compelling clinical question and a topic of debate among oncologists. A prospective study was conducted evaluating the use of a chemoresponse assay in recurrent ovarian cancer patients. Methods Women with persistent or recurrent ovarian cancer were enrolled under an IRB-approved protocol, and fresh tissue samples were collected for chemoresponse testing. Patients were treated with one of 15 protocol-designated treatments empirically selected by the oncologist, blinded to the assay results. Each treatment was classified by the assay as: sensitive (S), intermediate (I), or resistant (R). Patients were prospectively monitored for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Associations of assay response for the physician-selected treatment with PFS and OS were analyzed. Results A total of 262 evaluable patients were enrolled. Patients treated with an assay-sensitive regimen demonstrated significantly improved PFS and OS while there was no difference in clinical outcomes between I and R groups. Median PFS was 8.8 months for S vs. 5.9 months for I + R (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.67, p = 0.009). The association with assay response was consistent in both platinum-sensitive and platinum-resistant tumors (HR: 0.71 vs. 0.66) and was independent of other covariates in multivariate analysis (HR = 0.66, p = 0.020). A statistically significant14-month improvement in mean OS (37.5 months for S vs. 23.9 months for I + R, HR = 0.61, p = 0.010) was demonstrated. Conclusions This prospective study demonstrated improved PFS and OS for patients with either platinum-sensitive or platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer treated with assay-sensitive agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)362-367
Number of pages6
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume131
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Fingerprint

Ovarian Neoplasms
Disease-Free Survival
Prospective Studies
Platinum
Survival
Therapeutics
Research Ethics Committees
Clinical Protocols
Multivariate Analysis
Physicians
Neoplasms
Oncologists

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

A prospective study evaluating the clinical relevance of a chemoresponse assay for treatment of patients with persistent or recurrent ovarian cancer. / Rutherford, Thomas; Orr, James; Grendys, Edward; Edwards, Robert; Krivak, Thomas C.; Holloway, Robert; Moore, Richard G.; Puls, Larry; Tillmanns, Todd; Schink, Julian C.; Brower, Stacey L.; Tian, Chunqiao; Herzog, Thomas J.

In: Gynecologic Oncology, Vol. 131, No. 2, 01.11.2013, p. 362-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rutherford, T, Orr, J, Grendys, E, Edwards, R, Krivak, TC, Holloway, R, Moore, RG, Puls, L, Tillmanns, T, Schink, JC, Brower, SL, Tian, C & Herzog, TJ 2013, 'A prospective study evaluating the clinical relevance of a chemoresponse assay for treatment of patients with persistent or recurrent ovarian cancer', Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 131, no. 2, pp. 362-367. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2013.08.009
Rutherford, Thomas ; Orr, James ; Grendys, Edward ; Edwards, Robert ; Krivak, Thomas C. ; Holloway, Robert ; Moore, Richard G. ; Puls, Larry ; Tillmanns, Todd ; Schink, Julian C. ; Brower, Stacey L. ; Tian, Chunqiao ; Herzog, Thomas J. / A prospective study evaluating the clinical relevance of a chemoresponse assay for treatment of patients with persistent or recurrent ovarian cancer. In: Gynecologic Oncology. 2013 ; Vol. 131, No. 2. pp. 362-367.
@article{2a580e47566c4e978f3f1bbf24fe11e2,
title = "A prospective study evaluating the clinical relevance of a chemoresponse assay for treatment of patients with persistent or recurrent ovarian cancer",
abstract = "Objective Use of in vitro chemoresponse assays for informing effective treatment selection is a compelling clinical question and a topic of debate among oncologists. A prospective study was conducted evaluating the use of a chemoresponse assay in recurrent ovarian cancer patients. Methods Women with persistent or recurrent ovarian cancer were enrolled under an IRB-approved protocol, and fresh tissue samples were collected for chemoresponse testing. Patients were treated with one of 15 protocol-designated treatments empirically selected by the oncologist, blinded to the assay results. Each treatment was classified by the assay as: sensitive (S), intermediate (I), or resistant (R). Patients were prospectively monitored for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Associations of assay response for the physician-selected treatment with PFS and OS were analyzed. Results A total of 262 evaluable patients were enrolled. Patients treated with an assay-sensitive regimen demonstrated significantly improved PFS and OS while there was no difference in clinical outcomes between I and R groups. Median PFS was 8.8 months for S vs. 5.9 months for I + R (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.67, p = 0.009). The association with assay response was consistent in both platinum-sensitive and platinum-resistant tumors (HR: 0.71 vs. 0.66) and was independent of other covariates in multivariate analysis (HR = 0.66, p = 0.020). A statistically significant14-month improvement in mean OS (37.5 months for S vs. 23.9 months for I + R, HR = 0.61, p = 0.010) was demonstrated. Conclusions This prospective study demonstrated improved PFS and OS for patients with either platinum-sensitive or platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer treated with assay-sensitive agents.",
author = "Thomas Rutherford and James Orr and Edward Grendys and Robert Edwards and Krivak, {Thomas C.} and Robert Holloway and Moore, {Richard G.} and Larry Puls and Todd Tillmanns and Schink, {Julian C.} and Brower, {Stacey L.} and Chunqiao Tian and Herzog, {Thomas J.}",
year = "2013",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ygyno.2013.08.009",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "131",
pages = "362--367",
journal = "Gynecologic Oncology",
issn = "0090-8258",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A prospective study evaluating the clinical relevance of a chemoresponse assay for treatment of patients with persistent or recurrent ovarian cancer

AU - Rutherford, Thomas

AU - Orr, James

AU - Grendys, Edward

AU - Edwards, Robert

AU - Krivak, Thomas C.

AU - Holloway, Robert

AU - Moore, Richard G.

AU - Puls, Larry

AU - Tillmanns, Todd

AU - Schink, Julian C.

AU - Brower, Stacey L.

AU - Tian, Chunqiao

AU - Herzog, Thomas J.

PY - 2013/11/1

Y1 - 2013/11/1

N2 - Objective Use of in vitro chemoresponse assays for informing effective treatment selection is a compelling clinical question and a topic of debate among oncologists. A prospective study was conducted evaluating the use of a chemoresponse assay in recurrent ovarian cancer patients. Methods Women with persistent or recurrent ovarian cancer were enrolled under an IRB-approved protocol, and fresh tissue samples were collected for chemoresponse testing. Patients were treated with one of 15 protocol-designated treatments empirically selected by the oncologist, blinded to the assay results. Each treatment was classified by the assay as: sensitive (S), intermediate (I), or resistant (R). Patients were prospectively monitored for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Associations of assay response for the physician-selected treatment with PFS and OS were analyzed. Results A total of 262 evaluable patients were enrolled. Patients treated with an assay-sensitive regimen demonstrated significantly improved PFS and OS while there was no difference in clinical outcomes between I and R groups. Median PFS was 8.8 months for S vs. 5.9 months for I + R (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.67, p = 0.009). The association with assay response was consistent in both platinum-sensitive and platinum-resistant tumors (HR: 0.71 vs. 0.66) and was independent of other covariates in multivariate analysis (HR = 0.66, p = 0.020). A statistically significant14-month improvement in mean OS (37.5 months for S vs. 23.9 months for I + R, HR = 0.61, p = 0.010) was demonstrated. Conclusions This prospective study demonstrated improved PFS and OS for patients with either platinum-sensitive or platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer treated with assay-sensitive agents.

AB - Objective Use of in vitro chemoresponse assays for informing effective treatment selection is a compelling clinical question and a topic of debate among oncologists. A prospective study was conducted evaluating the use of a chemoresponse assay in recurrent ovarian cancer patients. Methods Women with persistent or recurrent ovarian cancer were enrolled under an IRB-approved protocol, and fresh tissue samples were collected for chemoresponse testing. Patients were treated with one of 15 protocol-designated treatments empirically selected by the oncologist, blinded to the assay results. Each treatment was classified by the assay as: sensitive (S), intermediate (I), or resistant (R). Patients were prospectively monitored for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Associations of assay response for the physician-selected treatment with PFS and OS were analyzed. Results A total of 262 evaluable patients were enrolled. Patients treated with an assay-sensitive regimen demonstrated significantly improved PFS and OS while there was no difference in clinical outcomes between I and R groups. Median PFS was 8.8 months for S vs. 5.9 months for I + R (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.67, p = 0.009). The association with assay response was consistent in both platinum-sensitive and platinum-resistant tumors (HR: 0.71 vs. 0.66) and was independent of other covariates in multivariate analysis (HR = 0.66, p = 0.020). A statistically significant14-month improvement in mean OS (37.5 months for S vs. 23.9 months for I + R, HR = 0.61, p = 0.010) was demonstrated. Conclusions This prospective study demonstrated improved PFS and OS for patients with either platinum-sensitive or platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer treated with assay-sensitive agents.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84886093926&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84886093926&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ygyno.2013.08.009

DO - 10.1016/j.ygyno.2013.08.009

M3 - Article

VL - 131

SP - 362

EP - 367

JO - Gynecologic Oncology

JF - Gynecologic Oncology

SN - 0090-8258

IS - 2

ER -