A randomized trial of mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells with cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor with or without cisplatin in patients with malignant lymphoma receiving high-dose chemotherapy

Charles H. Weaver, Bo Zhen, Lee Schwartzberg, Cynthia Walker, Sue Upton, C. Dean Buckner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the addition of cisplatin to cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G- CSF) for the mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). Eighty-one patients with malignant lymphoma were randomized to receive either cyclophosphamide 4 g/m2 and etoposide 600 mg/m2 (CE), and G-CSF 6 μg/kg/day (n = 41), or the same drugs with cisplatin 105 mg/m2 (CEP; n = 40) followed by collection of PBSC. Seventy-eight of 81 patients (96%) had apheresis performed and 70 (86%) received high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with PBSC support. The median number of CD34+ cells collected after CE was 19.77 compared with 9.39 x 106/kg after CEP (p = 0.09). More patients receiving CEP had grade 3-4 gastrointestinal (p = 0.03) and neurologic toxicities (p = 0.05), had significant delays in recovery of neutrophils (p = 0.0001) and platelets (p = 0.009), and received more red blood cell (p = 0.03) and platelet (p = 0.08) transfusions than patients receiving CE. There were no significant differences in treatment-related deaths, relapse, survival, or event-free survival between patients receiving CE or CEP when all 81 patients or the 70 patients receiving HDC were evaluated. It was concluded that the addition of cisplatin to CE did not improve CD34+ cell yields, was associated with more morbidity and resource utilization, and was not associated with improvement in outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)408-412
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
Etoposide
Cyclophosphamide
Cisplatin
Lymphoma
Drug Therapy
Blood Platelets
Blood Component Removal
Peripheral Blood Stem Cells
Nervous System
Disease-Free Survival
Neutrophils
Cell Count
Erythrocytes
Morbidity
Recurrence
Survival
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

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title = "A randomized trial of mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells with cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor with or without cisplatin in patients with malignant lymphoma receiving high-dose chemotherapy",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to evaluate the addition of cisplatin to cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G- CSF) for the mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). Eighty-one patients with malignant lymphoma were randomized to receive either cyclophosphamide 4 g/m2 and etoposide 600 mg/m2 (CE), and G-CSF 6 μg/kg/day (n = 41), or the same drugs with cisplatin 105 mg/m2 (CEP; n = 40) followed by collection of PBSC. Seventy-eight of 81 patients (96{\%}) had apheresis performed and 70 (86{\%}) received high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with PBSC support. The median number of CD34+ cells collected after CE was 19.77 compared with 9.39 x 106/kg after CEP (p = 0.09). More patients receiving CEP had grade 3-4 gastrointestinal (p = 0.03) and neurologic toxicities (p = 0.05), had significant delays in recovery of neutrophils (p = 0.0001) and platelets (p = 0.009), and received more red blood cell (p = 0.03) and platelet (p = 0.08) transfusions than patients receiving CE. There were no significant differences in treatment-related deaths, relapse, survival, or event-free survival between patients receiving CE or CEP when all 81 patients or the 70 patients receiving HDC were evaluated. It was concluded that the addition of cisplatin to CE did not improve CD34+ cell yields, was associated with more morbidity and resource utilization, and was not associated with improvement in outcomes.",
author = "Weaver, {Charles H.} and Bo Zhen and Lee Schwartzberg and Cynthia Walker and Sue Upton and {Dean Buckner}, C.",
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T1 - A randomized trial of mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells with cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor with or without cisplatin in patients with malignant lymphoma receiving high-dose chemotherapy

AU - Weaver, Charles H.

AU - Zhen, Bo

AU - Schwartzberg, Lee

AU - Walker, Cynthia

AU - Upton, Sue

AU - Dean Buckner, C.

PY - 1998/8/1

Y1 - 1998/8/1

N2 - The purpose of this study was to evaluate the addition of cisplatin to cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G- CSF) for the mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). Eighty-one patients with malignant lymphoma were randomized to receive either cyclophosphamide 4 g/m2 and etoposide 600 mg/m2 (CE), and G-CSF 6 μg/kg/day (n = 41), or the same drugs with cisplatin 105 mg/m2 (CEP; n = 40) followed by collection of PBSC. Seventy-eight of 81 patients (96%) had apheresis performed and 70 (86%) received high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with PBSC support. The median number of CD34+ cells collected after CE was 19.77 compared with 9.39 x 106/kg after CEP (p = 0.09). More patients receiving CEP had grade 3-4 gastrointestinal (p = 0.03) and neurologic toxicities (p = 0.05), had significant delays in recovery of neutrophils (p = 0.0001) and platelets (p = 0.009), and received more red blood cell (p = 0.03) and platelet (p = 0.08) transfusions than patients receiving CE. There were no significant differences in treatment-related deaths, relapse, survival, or event-free survival between patients receiving CE or CEP when all 81 patients or the 70 patients receiving HDC were evaluated. It was concluded that the addition of cisplatin to CE did not improve CD34+ cell yields, was associated with more morbidity and resource utilization, and was not associated with improvement in outcomes.

AB - The purpose of this study was to evaluate the addition of cisplatin to cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G- CSF) for the mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). Eighty-one patients with malignant lymphoma were randomized to receive either cyclophosphamide 4 g/m2 and etoposide 600 mg/m2 (CE), and G-CSF 6 μg/kg/day (n = 41), or the same drugs with cisplatin 105 mg/m2 (CEP; n = 40) followed by collection of PBSC. Seventy-eight of 81 patients (96%) had apheresis performed and 70 (86%) received high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with PBSC support. The median number of CD34+ cells collected after CE was 19.77 compared with 9.39 x 106/kg after CEP (p = 0.09). More patients receiving CEP had grade 3-4 gastrointestinal (p = 0.03) and neurologic toxicities (p = 0.05), had significant delays in recovery of neutrophils (p = 0.0001) and platelets (p = 0.009), and received more red blood cell (p = 0.03) and platelet (p = 0.08) transfusions than patients receiving CE. There were no significant differences in treatment-related deaths, relapse, survival, or event-free survival between patients receiving CE or CEP when all 81 patients or the 70 patients receiving HDC were evaluated. It was concluded that the addition of cisplatin to CE did not improve CD34+ cell yields, was associated with more morbidity and resource utilization, and was not associated with improvement in outcomes.

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