A review of current theories and treatments for phantom limb pain

Kassondra L. Collins, Hannah G. Russell, Patrick J. Schumacher, Katherine E. Robinson-Freeman, Ellen C. O'Conor, Kyla D. Gibney, Olivia Yambem, Robert W. Dykes, Robert Waters, Jack Tsao

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Following amputation, most amputees still report feeling the missing limb and often describe these feelings as excruciatingly painful. Phantom limb sensations (PLS) are useful while controlling a prosthesis; however, phantom limb pain (PLP) is a debilitating condition that drastically hinders quality of life. Although such experiences have been reported since the early 16th century, the etiology remains unknown. Debate continues regarding the roles of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Currently, the most posited mechanistic theories rely on neuronal network reorganization; however, greater consideration should be given to the role of the dorsal root ganglion within the peripheral nervous system. This Review provides an overview of the proposed mechanistic theories as well as an overview of various treatments for PLP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2168-2176
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume128
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

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Phantom Limb
Peripheral Nervous System
Emotions
Amputees
Spinal Ganglia
Therapeutics
Amputation
Prostheses and Implants
Extremities
Central Nervous System
Quality of Life

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Collins, K. L., Russell, H. G., Schumacher, P. J., Robinson-Freeman, K. E., O'Conor, E. C., Gibney, K. D., ... Tsao, J. (2018). A review of current theories and treatments for phantom limb pain. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 128(6), 2168-2176. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI94003

A review of current theories and treatments for phantom limb pain. / Collins, Kassondra L.; Russell, Hannah G.; Schumacher, Patrick J.; Robinson-Freeman, Katherine E.; O'Conor, Ellen C.; Gibney, Kyla D.; Yambem, Olivia; Dykes, Robert W.; Waters, Robert; Tsao, Jack.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 128, No. 6, 01.06.2018, p. 2168-2176.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Collins, KL, Russell, HG, Schumacher, PJ, Robinson-Freeman, KE, O'Conor, EC, Gibney, KD, Yambem, O, Dykes, RW, Waters, R & Tsao, J 2018, 'A review of current theories and treatments for phantom limb pain', Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 128, no. 6, pp. 2168-2176. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI94003
Collins KL, Russell HG, Schumacher PJ, Robinson-Freeman KE, O'Conor EC, Gibney KD et al. A review of current theories and treatments for phantom limb pain. Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2018 Jun 1;128(6):2168-2176. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI94003
Collins, Kassondra L. ; Russell, Hannah G. ; Schumacher, Patrick J. ; Robinson-Freeman, Katherine E. ; O'Conor, Ellen C. ; Gibney, Kyla D. ; Yambem, Olivia ; Dykes, Robert W. ; Waters, Robert ; Tsao, Jack. / A review of current theories and treatments for phantom limb pain. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2018 ; Vol. 128, No. 6. pp. 2168-2176.
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