A role for airway remodeling during respiratory syncytial virus infection

David Becnel, Dahui You, Joshua Erskin, Dawn M. Dimina, Stephania Cormier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Severe respiratory syncytial virus infection (RSV) during infancy has been shown to be a major risk factor for the development of subsequent wheeze. However, the reasons for this link remain unclear. The objective of this research was to determine the consequences of early exposure to RSV and allergen in the development of subsequent airway hyperreactivity (AHR) using a developmental time point in the mouse that parallels that of the human neonate. Methods: Weanling mice were sensitized and challeged with ovalbumin (Ova) and/or infected with RSV. Eight days after the last allergen challenge, various pathophysiological endpoints were examined. Results: AHR in responce to methacholine was enhanced only in weanling mice exposed to Ova and subsequently infected with RSV. The increase in AHR appeared to be unrelated to pulmonary RSV titer. Total bronchoalveolar lavage cellularity in these mice increased approximately two-fold relative to Ova alone and was attributable to increases in eosinophil and lymphocyte numbers. Enhanced pulmonary pathologies including persistent mucus production and subepithelial fibrosis were observed. Interestingly, these data correlated with transient increases in TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-5, and IL-2. Conclusion: The observed changes in pulmonary structure may provide an explanation for epidemiological data suggested that early exposure to allergens and RSV have long-term physiological consequences. Furthermore, the data presented here highlight the importance of preventative strategies against RSV infection of atopic individuals during neonatal development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number122
JournalRespiratory research
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 21 2005

Fingerprint

Airway Remodeling
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections
Ovalbumin
Allergens
Lung
Methacholine Chloride
Interleukin-5
Lymphocyte Count
Bronchoalveolar Lavage
Mucus
Viral Load
Eosinophils
Interleukin-2
Fibrosis
Pathology
Infection
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

A role for airway remodeling during respiratory syncytial virus infection. / Becnel, David; You, Dahui; Erskin, Joshua; Dimina, Dawn M.; Cormier, Stephania.

In: Respiratory research, Vol. 6, 122, 21.10.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Becnel, David ; You, Dahui ; Erskin, Joshua ; Dimina, Dawn M. ; Cormier, Stephania. / A role for airway remodeling during respiratory syncytial virus infection. In: Respiratory research. 2005 ; Vol. 6.
@article{d65e74b8f74c464982a5b28eaafa2fa0,
title = "A role for airway remodeling during respiratory syncytial virus infection",
abstract = "Background: Severe respiratory syncytial virus infection (RSV) during infancy has been shown to be a major risk factor for the development of subsequent wheeze. However, the reasons for this link remain unclear. The objective of this research was to determine the consequences of early exposure to RSV and allergen in the development of subsequent airway hyperreactivity (AHR) using a developmental time point in the mouse that parallels that of the human neonate. Methods: Weanling mice were sensitized and challeged with ovalbumin (Ova) and/or infected with RSV. Eight days after the last allergen challenge, various pathophysiological endpoints were examined. Results: AHR in responce to methacholine was enhanced only in weanling mice exposed to Ova and subsequently infected with RSV. The increase in AHR appeared to be unrelated to pulmonary RSV titer. Total bronchoalveolar lavage cellularity in these mice increased approximately two-fold relative to Ova alone and was attributable to increases in eosinophil and lymphocyte numbers. Enhanced pulmonary pathologies including persistent mucus production and subepithelial fibrosis were observed. Interestingly, these data correlated with transient increases in TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-5, and IL-2. Conclusion: The observed changes in pulmonary structure may provide an explanation for epidemiological data suggested that early exposure to allergens and RSV have long-term physiological consequences. Furthermore, the data presented here highlight the importance of preventative strategies against RSV infection of atopic individuals during neonatal development.",
author = "David Becnel and Dahui You and Joshua Erskin and Dimina, {Dawn M.} and Stephania Cormier",
year = "2005",
month = "10",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1186/1465-9921-6-122",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
journal = "Respiratory Research",
issn = "1465-9921",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A role for airway remodeling during respiratory syncytial virus infection

AU - Becnel, David

AU - You, Dahui

AU - Erskin, Joshua

AU - Dimina, Dawn M.

AU - Cormier, Stephania

PY - 2005/10/21

Y1 - 2005/10/21

N2 - Background: Severe respiratory syncytial virus infection (RSV) during infancy has been shown to be a major risk factor for the development of subsequent wheeze. However, the reasons for this link remain unclear. The objective of this research was to determine the consequences of early exposure to RSV and allergen in the development of subsequent airway hyperreactivity (AHR) using a developmental time point in the mouse that parallels that of the human neonate. Methods: Weanling mice were sensitized and challeged with ovalbumin (Ova) and/or infected with RSV. Eight days after the last allergen challenge, various pathophysiological endpoints were examined. Results: AHR in responce to methacholine was enhanced only in weanling mice exposed to Ova and subsequently infected with RSV. The increase in AHR appeared to be unrelated to pulmonary RSV titer. Total bronchoalveolar lavage cellularity in these mice increased approximately two-fold relative to Ova alone and was attributable to increases in eosinophil and lymphocyte numbers. Enhanced pulmonary pathologies including persistent mucus production and subepithelial fibrosis were observed. Interestingly, these data correlated with transient increases in TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-5, and IL-2. Conclusion: The observed changes in pulmonary structure may provide an explanation for epidemiological data suggested that early exposure to allergens and RSV have long-term physiological consequences. Furthermore, the data presented here highlight the importance of preventative strategies against RSV infection of atopic individuals during neonatal development.

AB - Background: Severe respiratory syncytial virus infection (RSV) during infancy has been shown to be a major risk factor for the development of subsequent wheeze. However, the reasons for this link remain unclear. The objective of this research was to determine the consequences of early exposure to RSV and allergen in the development of subsequent airway hyperreactivity (AHR) using a developmental time point in the mouse that parallels that of the human neonate. Methods: Weanling mice were sensitized and challeged with ovalbumin (Ova) and/or infected with RSV. Eight days after the last allergen challenge, various pathophysiological endpoints were examined. Results: AHR in responce to methacholine was enhanced only in weanling mice exposed to Ova and subsequently infected with RSV. The increase in AHR appeared to be unrelated to pulmonary RSV titer. Total bronchoalveolar lavage cellularity in these mice increased approximately two-fold relative to Ova alone and was attributable to increases in eosinophil and lymphocyte numbers. Enhanced pulmonary pathologies including persistent mucus production and subepithelial fibrosis were observed. Interestingly, these data correlated with transient increases in TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-5, and IL-2. Conclusion: The observed changes in pulmonary structure may provide an explanation for epidemiological data suggested that early exposure to allergens and RSV have long-term physiological consequences. Furthermore, the data presented here highlight the importance of preventative strategies against RSV infection of atopic individuals during neonatal development.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=27744604739&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=27744604739&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1465-9921-6-122

DO - 10.1186/1465-9921-6-122

M3 - Article

VL - 6

JO - Respiratory Research

JF - Respiratory Research

SN - 1465-9921

M1 - 122

ER -