A simplified method for endotracheal intubation in the rat

Benny Weksler, B. Ng, J. Lenert, M. Burt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Endotracheal intubation in small laboratory animals is often necessary for survival experiments. Methods of airway control have included tracheostomy, blind intubation, and intubation under direct vision. Most of these methods are unsatisfactory and associated with high failure and complication rate. We developed an easy method of endotracheal intubation in the rat that requires simple material that is easily available to any research facility. The animals were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium, the tongue was pulled out, and an otoscope was introduced into the oropharynx. By direct vision, a guide wire was inserted into the trachea and a 16-gauge intravenous catheter was glided over the wire. The first group of 70 rats underwent left thoracotomy with endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation at our laboratory as part of a study on isolated lung perfusion. The second group of five rats was anesthetized with pentobarbital, and a left carotid catheter and an endotracheal tube were inserted. Animals were ventilated with 100% O2. Arterial blood gases were sampled before intubation, 30 min after ventilation, and 60 min after extubation. In the first group, 94.3% (66 of 70) of the animals survived surgery and mortality was not directly related to the intubation and/or ventilation. All five animals of the second group survived the procedure to be extubated. Arterial PO2 before intubation, 30 min after intubation and ventilation, and 60 min after extubation was 77.1 ± 8.5, 465.0 ± 55.6, and 98.9 ± 12.8 Torr, respectively. PCO2 at the same time points was 42.5 ± 10.1, 35.1 ± 6.3, and 32.7 ± 6.5 Torr, respectively. This is an easy, fast, and safe method for endotracheal intubation that will be useful to investigators in the cardiopulmonary physiology field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1823-1825
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of applied physiology
Volume76
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

Fingerprint

Intratracheal Intubation
Intubation
Ventilation
Pentobarbital
Otoscopes
Catheters
Oropharynx
Airway Management
Tracheostomy
Laboratory Animals
Thoracotomy
Trachea
Artificial Respiration
Tongue
Perfusion
Gases
Research Personnel
Lung
Mortality
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

A simplified method for endotracheal intubation in the rat. / Weksler, Benny; Ng, B.; Lenert, J.; Burt, M.

In: Journal of applied physiology, Vol. 76, No. 4, 01.01.1994, p. 1823-1825.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weksler, Benny ; Ng, B. ; Lenert, J. ; Burt, M. / A simplified method for endotracheal intubation in the rat. In: Journal of applied physiology. 1994 ; Vol. 76, No. 4. pp. 1823-1825.
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