A standardized curriculum to introduce novice health professional students to practice-based learning and improvement

A multi-institutional pilot study

Jonathan T. Huntington, Paula Dycus, Carolyn Hix, Rita West, Leslie McKeon, Mary T. Coleman, Donna Hathaway, Cynthia McCurren, Greg Ogrinc

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) combines the science of continuous quality improvement with the pragmatics of day-to-day clinical care delivery. PBLI is a core-learning domain in nursing and medical education. We developed a workbook-based, project-focused curriculum to teach PBLI to novice health professional students. Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy of a standardized curriculum to teach PBLI. Desing: Nonrandomized, controlled trial with medical and nursing students from 3 institutions. Methods: Faculty used the workbook to facilitate completion of an improvement project with 16 participants. Both participants and controls (N = 15) completed instruments to measure PBLI knowledge and self-efficacy. Participants also completed a satisfaction survey and presented project posters at a national conference. Results: There was no significant difference in PBLI knowledge between groups. Self-efficacy of participants was higher than that of controls in identifying best practice, identifying measures, identifying successful local improvement work, implementing a structured change plan, and using Plan-Do-Study-Act methodology. Participant satisfaction with the curriculum was high. Conclusion: Although PBLI knowledge was similar between groups, participants had higher self-efficacy and confidently disseminated their findings via formal poster presentation. This pilot study suggests that using a workbook-based, project-focused approach may be effective in teaching PBLI to novice health professional students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)174-181
Number of pages8
JournalQuality Management in Health Care
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

Fingerprint

health professionals
Curriculum
Learning
Students
curriculum
Health
learning
student
Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
Posters
poster
nursing
Nursing Students
Nursing Education
Quality Improvement
Medical Education
Medical Students
Practice Guidelines
teaching practice

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Leadership and Management
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning

Cite this

A standardized curriculum to introduce novice health professional students to practice-based learning and improvement : A multi-institutional pilot study. / Huntington, Jonathan T.; Dycus, Paula; Hix, Carolyn; West, Rita; McKeon, Leslie; Coleman, Mary T.; Hathaway, Donna; McCurren, Cynthia; Ogrinc, Greg.

In: Quality Management in Health Care, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.07.2009, p. 174-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huntington, Jonathan T. ; Dycus, Paula ; Hix, Carolyn ; West, Rita ; McKeon, Leslie ; Coleman, Mary T. ; Hathaway, Donna ; McCurren, Cynthia ; Ogrinc, Greg. / A standardized curriculum to introduce novice health professional students to practice-based learning and improvement : A multi-institutional pilot study. In: Quality Management in Health Care. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 174-181.
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