A study of occlusion and arch widths in families

Edward Harris, Richard J. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is often claimed that occlusal variation (“malocclusion”) is under strong genetic control. This study of a large age-standardized series of families (parents and offspring) shows that the genetic contribution to occlusal variation is quite low. On average, only about 10 percent of the variation in overjet, overbite, crowding, tooth rotations, and molar relationships results from nonenvironmental causes. In contrast, about 60 percent of the variation in measurements of arch size and shape is attributable to heredity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-163
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthodontics
Volume78
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980

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Malocclusion
Overbite
Heredity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

A study of occlusion and arch widths in families. / Harris, Edward; Smith, Richard J.

In: American Journal of Orthodontics, Vol. 78, No. 2, 01.01.1980, p. 155-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harris, Edward ; Smith, Richard J. / A study of occlusion and arch widths in families. In: American Journal of Orthodontics. 1980 ; Vol. 78, No. 2. pp. 155-163.
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