A study of the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and other markers of upper gastrointestinal tract disease in patients with rosacea

Virender K. Sharma, Annette Lynn, Marsha Kaminski, Rajeev Vasudeva, Colin Howden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Recent reports have suggested that patients with rosacea, a chronic inflammatory skin disorder of unknown etiology, have an increased prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. However, no causal relation has been identified. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection and upper gastrointestinal symptoms in rosacea patients and in subjects without chronic skin disorders. Methods: Forty-five patients with rosacea and 43 healthy subjects underwent serological testing for H. pylori infection. Demographics, gastrointestinal symptoms, and medication use were recorded using a structured questionnaire. Results: There was no significant difference in the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection between rosacea patients and healthy subjects (26.7% vs 34.9%; p = 0.40). Significantly more patients with rosacea complained of indigestion (66.7% vs 32.6%; p = 0.001) and used antacids (60% vs 32.6; p = 0.01). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of H. pylori infection between symptomatic and asymptomatic rosacea patients, or in those using antacids. There were no differences in the frequency of heartburn, history of peptic ulcer disease, family history of peptic ulcer disease, use of H2-receptor antagonists, or use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Conclusions: Patients with rosacea have similar rates of H. pylori infection as healthy subjects. Rosacea patients complain significantly more frequently of 'indigestion' and use more antacids unrelated to H. pylori infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-222
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume93
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1998

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Rosacea
Upper Gastrointestinal Tract
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Helicobacter Infections
Helicobacter pylori
Cross-Sectional Studies
Antacids
Healthy Volunteers
Dyspepsia
Peptic Ulcer
Heartburn
Skin
Histamine H2 Receptors
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

A study of the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and other markers of upper gastrointestinal tract disease in patients with rosacea. / Sharma, Virender K.; Lynn, Annette; Kaminski, Marsha; Vasudeva, Rajeev; Howden, Colin.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 93, No. 2, 01.02.1998, p. 220-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: Recent reports have suggested that patients with rosacea, a chronic inflammatory skin disorder of unknown etiology, have an increased prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. However, no causal relation has been identified. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection and upper gastrointestinal symptoms in rosacea patients and in subjects without chronic skin disorders. Methods: Forty-five patients with rosacea and 43 healthy subjects underwent serological testing for H. pylori infection. Demographics, gastrointestinal symptoms, and medication use were recorded using a structured questionnaire. Results: There was no significant difference in the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection between rosacea patients and healthy subjects (26.7{\%} vs 34.9{\%}; p = 0.40). Significantly more patients with rosacea complained of indigestion (66.7{\%} vs 32.6{\%}; p = 0.001) and used antacids (60{\%} vs 32.6; p = 0.01). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of H. pylori infection between symptomatic and asymptomatic rosacea patients, or in those using antacids. There were no differences in the frequency of heartburn, history of peptic ulcer disease, family history of peptic ulcer disease, use of H2-receptor antagonists, or use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Conclusions: Patients with rosacea have similar rates of H. pylori infection as healthy subjects. Rosacea patients complain significantly more frequently of 'indigestion' and use more antacids unrelated to H. pylori infection.",
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