A Surgeon With AIDS

Lack of Evidence of Transmission to Patients

Ban Mishu, William Schaffner, John M. Horan, Laurel H. Wood, Robert H. Hutcheson, Paul Mcnabb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In January 1988, the media reported the identity of a surgeon who was recently diagnosed with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Concern about surgeon-to-patient transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persisted despite reassurances from health authorities. Therefore, HIV antibody testing was offered to the surgeon’s patients. We identified 2160 patients operated on since 1982; none had been reported to Tennessee’s AIDS registry. A total of 264 had already died; none were reported to have died of AIDS or other HIV-related diseases. Of the 1896 patients remaining, we contacted 1652; 616 (37%) were tested. Only one (an intravenous drug user) was HIV antibody positive, and his medical history suggested that he may already have had AIDS at the time of his surgery. These results support the concept that the risks to patients operated on by HIV-infected surgeons are most likely quite low and support recommendations for the individualized assessment of HIV-infected health care workers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)467-470
Number of pages4
JournalJAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume264
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 25 1990

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Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV
Antibodies
Virus Diseases
Drug Users
Registries
Surgeons
Delivery of Health Care
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mishu, B., Schaffner, W., Horan, J. M., Wood, L. H., Hutcheson, R. H., & Mcnabb, P. (1990). A Surgeon With AIDS: Lack of Evidence of Transmission to Patients. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 264(4), 467-470. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.1990.03450040063032

A Surgeon With AIDS : Lack of Evidence of Transmission to Patients. / Mishu, Ban; Schaffner, William; Horan, John M.; Wood, Laurel H.; Hutcheson, Robert H.; Mcnabb, Paul.

In: JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 264, No. 4, 25.07.1990, p. 467-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mishu, B, Schaffner, W, Horan, JM, Wood, LH, Hutcheson, RH & Mcnabb, P 1990, 'A Surgeon With AIDS: Lack of Evidence of Transmission to Patients', JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 264, no. 4, pp. 467-470. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.1990.03450040063032
Mishu, Ban ; Schaffner, William ; Horan, John M. ; Wood, Laurel H. ; Hutcheson, Robert H. ; Mcnabb, Paul. / A Surgeon With AIDS : Lack of Evidence of Transmission to Patients. In: JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association. 1990 ; Vol. 264, No. 4. pp. 467-470.
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