A Survey-based Study of Pharmacist Acceptance and Resistance to Health Information Technology

Alaina B. Darby, Yin Su, Rebecca Reynolds, Charisse Madlock-Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Because user acceptance and resistance to the use of health information technology (HIT) affects system utilization and previous studies in this area have typically excluded pharmacists, this study specifically addresses the response of institutional pharmacists to HIT. Methods: A survey investigating pharmacists' responses to electronic medical record (EMR) system use was developed using questions modified from previously validated research. The survey was distributed electronically to the mailing list for pharmacy preceptors for the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy. Descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate analyses were used to analyze the collected data based on a previously validated dual-factor model. Results: Of the 96 responses from institutional pharmacists, 64 responses (66.7 percent) were complete and usable. Of the acceptance and resistance constructs evaluated, only attitude and perceived behavior control were found to be significantly associated with acceptance of use (p = .036 and p = .025, respectively), and only transition cost was found to be significantly associated with resistance to use (p = .018). System vendor and interface integration were also significantly associated with acceptance of use. These findings suggest that attitude, perceived behavior control, and transition costs may have the most impact on pharmacists' responses to the use of EMR systems. Conclusion: It is reasonable for hospitals to focus efforts on specific factors influencing acceptance of and resistance to EMR use and, before a system is selected, to consider the effects of vendor selection and level of interface integration on acceptance of use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPerspectives in health information management
Volume16
Issue numberSpring
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Medical Informatics
Pharmacists
Electronic Health Records
Behavior Control
Costs and Cost Analysis
Multivariate Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Purpose: Because user acceptance and resistance to the use of health information technology (HIT) affects system utilization and previous studies in this area have typically excluded pharmacists, this study specifically addresses the response of institutional pharmacists to HIT. Methods: A survey investigating pharmacists' responses to electronic medical record (EMR) system use was developed using questions modified from previously validated research. The survey was distributed electronically to the mailing list for pharmacy preceptors for the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy. Descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate analyses were used to analyze the collected data based on a previously validated dual-factor model. Results: Of the 96 responses from institutional pharmacists, 64 responses (66.7 percent) were complete and usable. Of the acceptance and resistance constructs evaluated, only attitude and perceived behavior control were found to be significantly associated with acceptance of use (p = .036 and p = .025, respectively), and only transition cost was found to be significantly associated with resistance to use (p = .018). System vendor and interface integration were also significantly associated with acceptance of use. These findings suggest that attitude, perceived behavior control, and transition costs may have the most impact on pharmacists' responses to the use of EMR systems. Conclusion: It is reasonable for hospitals to focus efforts on specific factors influencing acceptance of and resistance to EMR use and, before a system is selected, to consider the effects of vendor selection and level of interface integration on acceptance of use.",
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