A survey of american association for the surgery of trauma member practices in the management of blunt splenic injury

Ben L. Zarzaur, Rosemary A. Kozar, Timothy Fabian, Raul Coimbra

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Conflicting data exist regarding pseudoaneurysm screening (PSA-S), initial angioembolization (IE), deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis (DVT-P), and activity limitation after hemodynamically stable blunt splenic injury (BSI). To determine whether there was consensus regarding BSI management, the multi-institutional trial committee of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) approved a survey of member practice patterns regarding BSI management. Methods: Over 2 months, AAST members were invited to participate in an online survey. Practice patterns and attitudes surrounding PSA-S, IE, DVT-P, and activity limitation after BSI were determined. Results: The response rate was 37.5%. Practice patterns varied by injury grade. Observation only was thought appropriate for grades I (94.4%) and II (84.6%) injuries. For grades III to V injuries, fewer and fewer respondents felt observation only was appropriate. PSA-S was the most commonly used strategy for grades IV and V injuries (32.7% and 28.2%), and IE was thought to be appropriate by 23.5% of respondents for grade IV injuries and 25.5% of respondents with grade V injuries. Thirty percent of respondents felt that no DVT-P was indicated for adult patients with BSI. Recommendations regarding return to full activity varied by perceived risk to the patient and by injury grade. There is considerable variation in the opinions of AAST members regarding BSI management, particularly for high-grade injuries. These results will aid in the design of prospective observational and random trials to determine optimal BSI management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1026-1031
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume70
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

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Nonpenetrating Wounds
Practice Management
Wounds and Injuries
False Aneurysm
Venous Thrombosis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Observation
Consensus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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A survey of american association for the surgery of trauma member practices in the management of blunt splenic injury. / Zarzaur, Ben L.; Kozar, Rosemary A.; Fabian, Timothy; Coimbra, Raul.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 70, No. 5, 01.05.2011, p. 1026-1031.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Zarzaur, Ben L. ; Kozar, Rosemary A. ; Fabian, Timothy ; Coimbra, Raul. / A survey of american association for the surgery of trauma member practices in the management of blunt splenic injury. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 2011 ; Vol. 70, No. 5. pp. 1026-1031.
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abstract = "Objective: Conflicting data exist regarding pseudoaneurysm screening (PSA-S), initial angioembolization (IE), deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis (DVT-P), and activity limitation after hemodynamically stable blunt splenic injury (BSI). To determine whether there was consensus regarding BSI management, the multi-institutional trial committee of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) approved a survey of member practice patterns regarding BSI management. Methods: Over 2 months, AAST members were invited to participate in an online survey. Practice patterns and attitudes surrounding PSA-S, IE, DVT-P, and activity limitation after BSI were determined. Results: The response rate was 37.5{\%}. Practice patterns varied by injury grade. Observation only was thought appropriate for grades I (94.4{\%}) and II (84.6{\%}) injuries. For grades III to V injuries, fewer and fewer respondents felt observation only was appropriate. PSA-S was the most commonly used strategy for grades IV and V injuries (32.7{\%} and 28.2{\%}), and IE was thought to be appropriate by 23.5{\%} of respondents for grade IV injuries and 25.5{\%} of respondents with grade V injuries. Thirty percent of respondents felt that no DVT-P was indicated for adult patients with BSI. Recommendations regarding return to full activity varied by perceived risk to the patient and by injury grade. There is considerable variation in the opinions of AAST members regarding BSI management, particularly for high-grade injuries. These results will aid in the design of prospective observational and random trials to determine optimal BSI management.",
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