A survey of gastroenterologists' perceptions and practices related to Helicobacter pylori infection

Virender K. Sharma, Rajeev Vasudeva, Colin Howden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the current practice of gastroenterologists in the United States concerning Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS: We mailed a structured questionnaire to 1000 gastroenterologists chosen at random from a national database. We asked about personal and practice demographics and practices relating to testing for, and treating, H. pylori infection. RESULTS: A total of 922 questionnaires were delivered, from which we received 286 responses (31%). Respondents used many different tests for H. pylori infection, but only 10% each had used either the 13C- or 14C-urea breath test. Testing for H. pylori infection was usually for appropriate reasons, although 21% indicated that they might not treat a patient with a positive test result. Different multiple treatment regimens were used; the most frequent were combinations of a proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, and either amoxicillin or metronidazole. Estimates of the prevalence of antibiotic resistance were highly variable and often inaccurate. Most respondents would not check asymptomatic individuals for the infection; however, in the absence of symptoms, 38% would personally undergo testing and treatment if positive. CONCLUSIONS: Gastroenterologists usually test for H. pylori infection in appropriate conditions, but may not always treat the infection based on a positive test result. Most use efficacious regimens to treat the infection although many have inaccurate information on resistance rates, which may adversely influence prescribing. Many would have testing and, if positive, treatment in the absence of symptoms or a specific diagnosis, but do not recommend this for their patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3170-3174
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume94
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Helicobacter Infections
Helicobacter pylori
Asymptomatic Infections
Breath Tests
Clarithromycin
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Amoxicillin
Metronidazole
Microbial Drug Resistance
Infection
Urea
Therapeutics
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires
Gastroenterologists
Databases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

A survey of gastroenterologists' perceptions and practices related to Helicobacter pylori infection. / Sharma, Virender K.; Vasudeva, Rajeev; Howden, Colin.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 94, No. 11, 01.11.1999, p. 3170-3174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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