A twenty year survey of arterial complications of renal transplantation

Mitchell Goldman, N. L. Tilney, G. C. Vineyard, H. Laks, M. G. Kahan, R. E. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The significant arterial complications of renal transplantation are hemorrhage, infarction, stenosis and aneurysm formation. Hemorrhage is often associated with sepsis and may be life threatening. Large infarcts may be secondary to multiple small vessels or intraoperative hypotension with inadequate perfusion of the organ. Nephrectomy is invariably indicated in these situations. Renal artery stenosis with resultant hypertension may occur secondary to stenosis at the anastomosis, atherosclerotic plaque formation or intimal fibrosis of the renal artery. Operative reconstruction of the anastomotic site may relieve hypertension in selected patients but places the transplanted kidney greatly at risk. Aneurysm formation is often myocotic and is associated with multiple operations and wound sepsis. The iliac artery may be ligated without loss of limb, while the resultant claudication may be relieved by a surgical bypass procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)758-760
Number of pages3
JournalSurgery Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume141
Issue number5
StatePublished - Dec 1 1975
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Kidney Transplantation
Aneurysm
Sepsis
Pathologic Constriction
Tunica Intima
Hemorrhage
Hypertension
Renal Artery Obstruction
Iliac Artery
Renal Artery
Atherosclerotic Plaques
Nephrectomy
Hypotension
Infarction
Fibrosis
Extremities
Perfusion
Kidney
Wounds and Injuries
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Goldman, M., Tilney, N. L., Vineyard, G. C., Laks, H., Kahan, M. G., & Wilson, R. E. (1975). A twenty year survey of arterial complications of renal transplantation. Surgery Gynecology and Obstetrics, 141(5), 758-760.

A twenty year survey of arterial complications of renal transplantation. / Goldman, Mitchell; Tilney, N. L.; Vineyard, G. C.; Laks, H.; Kahan, M. G.; Wilson, R. E.

In: Surgery Gynecology and Obstetrics, Vol. 141, No. 5, 01.12.1975, p. 758-760.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldman, M, Tilney, NL, Vineyard, GC, Laks, H, Kahan, MG & Wilson, RE 1975, 'A twenty year survey of arterial complications of renal transplantation', Surgery Gynecology and Obstetrics, vol. 141, no. 5, pp. 758-760.
Goldman M, Tilney NL, Vineyard GC, Laks H, Kahan MG, Wilson RE. A twenty year survey of arterial complications of renal transplantation. Surgery Gynecology and Obstetrics. 1975 Dec 1;141(5):758-760.
Goldman, Mitchell ; Tilney, N. L. ; Vineyard, G. C. ; Laks, H. ; Kahan, M. G. ; Wilson, R. E. / A twenty year survey of arterial complications of renal transplantation. In: Surgery Gynecology and Obstetrics. 1975 ; Vol. 141, No. 5. pp. 758-760.
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