Abnormal primary tissue collagen composition in the skin of recurrent incisional hernia patients

Brent White, Charles Osier, Nana Gletsu, Louis Jeansonne, Mercedeh Baghai, Melanie Sherman, C. Daniel Smith, Bruce Ramshaw, Edward Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recurrence of incisional hernia may be as high as 50 per cent. Abnormal collagen I/III ratios have been observed within scar tissue of patients with recurrent incisional hernias. We sought to determine whether collagen composition in primary, nonscarred tissue was similarly affected in these patients. In this prospective, case-control study, nonscarred, primary abdominal wall skin and fascia biopsies were obtained in 12 patients with a history of recurrent incisional hernias and 11 control subjects without any history of hernia while undergoing abdominal laparoscopic surgery. Tissue protein expression of collagen I and III was assessed by immunohistochemistry followed by densitometry analysis. The collagen I/III ratio in skin biopsies from the recurrent hernia group was significantly less compared with control subjects (0.88 ± 0.01 versus 0.98 ± 0.04, respectively, P < 0.05). Fascia biopsies from patients with recurrent hernias was not significantly decreased in collagen I/III ratio compared with control subjects (0.90 ± 0.04 versus 0.94 ± 0.03, respectively, P = 0.17). Decreased collagen I/III ratios within the skin of patients with recurrent hernias not involved with scar or healing tissue suggest an underlying collagen composition defect. Such a primary collagen defect, in addition to abnormal scar formation, likely plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of recurrent incisional hernias.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1254-1258
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume73
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Collagen
Skin
Hernia
Cicatrix
Fascia
Biopsy
Incisional Hernia
Densitometry
Abdominal Wall
Laparoscopy
Case-Control Studies
Immunohistochemistry
Recurrence
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

White, B., Osier, C., Gletsu, N., Jeansonne, L., Baghai, M., Sherman, M., ... Lin, E. (2007). Abnormal primary tissue collagen composition in the skin of recurrent incisional hernia patients. American Surgeon, 73(12), 1254-1258.

Abnormal primary tissue collagen composition in the skin of recurrent incisional hernia patients. / White, Brent; Osier, Charles; Gletsu, Nana; Jeansonne, Louis; Baghai, Mercedeh; Sherman, Melanie; Smith, C. Daniel; Ramshaw, Bruce; Lin, Edward.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 73, No. 12, 12.2007, p. 1254-1258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

White, B, Osier, C, Gletsu, N, Jeansonne, L, Baghai, M, Sherman, M, Smith, CD, Ramshaw, B & Lin, E 2007, 'Abnormal primary tissue collagen composition in the skin of recurrent incisional hernia patients', American Surgeon, vol. 73, no. 12, pp. 1254-1258.
White B, Osier C, Gletsu N, Jeansonne L, Baghai M, Sherman M et al. Abnormal primary tissue collagen composition in the skin of recurrent incisional hernia patients. American Surgeon. 2007 Dec;73(12):1254-1258.
White, Brent ; Osier, Charles ; Gletsu, Nana ; Jeansonne, Louis ; Baghai, Mercedeh ; Sherman, Melanie ; Smith, C. Daniel ; Ramshaw, Bruce ; Lin, Edward. / Abnormal primary tissue collagen composition in the skin of recurrent incisional hernia patients. In: American Surgeon. 2007 ; Vol. 73, No. 12. pp. 1254-1258.
@article{c6b2a4d134eb4de4a0559a5975fcb43c,
title = "Abnormal primary tissue collagen composition in the skin of recurrent incisional hernia patients",
abstract = "Recurrence of incisional hernia may be as high as 50 per cent. Abnormal collagen I/III ratios have been observed within scar tissue of patients with recurrent incisional hernias. We sought to determine whether collagen composition in primary, nonscarred tissue was similarly affected in these patients. In this prospective, case-control study, nonscarred, primary abdominal wall skin and fascia biopsies were obtained in 12 patients with a history of recurrent incisional hernias and 11 control subjects without any history of hernia while undergoing abdominal laparoscopic surgery. Tissue protein expression of collagen I and III was assessed by immunohistochemistry followed by densitometry analysis. The collagen I/III ratio in skin biopsies from the recurrent hernia group was significantly less compared with control subjects (0.88 ± 0.01 versus 0.98 ± 0.04, respectively, P < 0.05). Fascia biopsies from patients with recurrent hernias was not significantly decreased in collagen I/III ratio compared with control subjects (0.90 ± 0.04 versus 0.94 ± 0.03, respectively, P = 0.17). Decreased collagen I/III ratios within the skin of patients with recurrent hernias not involved with scar or healing tissue suggest an underlying collagen composition defect. Such a primary collagen defect, in addition to abnormal scar formation, likely plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of recurrent incisional hernias.",
author = "Brent White and Charles Osier and Nana Gletsu and Louis Jeansonne and Mercedeh Baghai and Melanie Sherman and Smith, {C. Daniel} and Bruce Ramshaw and Edward Lin",
year = "2007",
month = "12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "73",
pages = "1254--1258",
journal = "American Surgeon",
issn = "0003-1348",
publisher = "Southeastern Surgical Congress",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Abnormal primary tissue collagen composition in the skin of recurrent incisional hernia patients

AU - White, Brent

AU - Osier, Charles

AU - Gletsu, Nana

AU - Jeansonne, Louis

AU - Baghai, Mercedeh

AU - Sherman, Melanie

AU - Smith, C. Daniel

AU - Ramshaw, Bruce

AU - Lin, Edward

PY - 2007/12

Y1 - 2007/12

N2 - Recurrence of incisional hernia may be as high as 50 per cent. Abnormal collagen I/III ratios have been observed within scar tissue of patients with recurrent incisional hernias. We sought to determine whether collagen composition in primary, nonscarred tissue was similarly affected in these patients. In this prospective, case-control study, nonscarred, primary abdominal wall skin and fascia biopsies were obtained in 12 patients with a history of recurrent incisional hernias and 11 control subjects without any history of hernia while undergoing abdominal laparoscopic surgery. Tissue protein expression of collagen I and III was assessed by immunohistochemistry followed by densitometry analysis. The collagen I/III ratio in skin biopsies from the recurrent hernia group was significantly less compared with control subjects (0.88 ± 0.01 versus 0.98 ± 0.04, respectively, P < 0.05). Fascia biopsies from patients with recurrent hernias was not significantly decreased in collagen I/III ratio compared with control subjects (0.90 ± 0.04 versus 0.94 ± 0.03, respectively, P = 0.17). Decreased collagen I/III ratios within the skin of patients with recurrent hernias not involved with scar or healing tissue suggest an underlying collagen composition defect. Such a primary collagen defect, in addition to abnormal scar formation, likely plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of recurrent incisional hernias.

AB - Recurrence of incisional hernia may be as high as 50 per cent. Abnormal collagen I/III ratios have been observed within scar tissue of patients with recurrent incisional hernias. We sought to determine whether collagen composition in primary, nonscarred tissue was similarly affected in these patients. In this prospective, case-control study, nonscarred, primary abdominal wall skin and fascia biopsies were obtained in 12 patients with a history of recurrent incisional hernias and 11 control subjects without any history of hernia while undergoing abdominal laparoscopic surgery. Tissue protein expression of collagen I and III was assessed by immunohistochemistry followed by densitometry analysis. The collagen I/III ratio in skin biopsies from the recurrent hernia group was significantly less compared with control subjects (0.88 ± 0.01 versus 0.98 ± 0.04, respectively, P < 0.05). Fascia biopsies from patients with recurrent hernias was not significantly decreased in collagen I/III ratio compared with control subjects (0.90 ± 0.04 versus 0.94 ± 0.03, respectively, P = 0.17). Decreased collagen I/III ratios within the skin of patients with recurrent hernias not involved with scar or healing tissue suggest an underlying collagen composition defect. Such a primary collagen defect, in addition to abnormal scar formation, likely plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of recurrent incisional hernias.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=38849083502&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=38849083502&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 73

SP - 1254

EP - 1258

JO - American Surgeon

JF - American Surgeon

SN - 0003-1348

IS - 12

ER -