Absence of the vitamin K-dependent bone protein in fetal rat mineral. Evidence for another γ-carboxyglutamic acid-containing component in bone

P. A. Price, J. W. Lothringer, Satoru Nishimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Fetal rat bone mineral has less than 0.1% of the adult level of the extractable, γ-carboxyglutamic acid-containing protein of bone (BGP). The level of BGP rises rapidly after birth to 65% of the adult level at 24 days of age. This increase parallels the transition from the amorphous calcium phosphate phase of fetal bone to the hydroxyapatite mineral of adult bone. BGP can also be detected in rat serum, and gel filtration studies show that it has the same apparent molecular weight as BGP purified from bone. Newborn rat serum BGP levels appear to be independent of bone BGP levels, since the level of BGP in newborn rat serum is approximately equal to the adult level, while the level of BGP in newborn rat bone is 50-fold less. The implications of the developmental appearance of BGP in the rat are discussed. Fetal rat bone which is nearly divoid of extractable BGP has 30% of the adult level of γ-carboxyglutamic acid. In contrast to adult rat bone, the γ-carboxyglutamic acid-containing component of fetal rat bone is not extracted from bone during demineralization. Thus, there may be a new γ-carboxyglutamic acid-containing protein in fetal bone which is associated strongly with the collagenous bone matrix. The radioimmunoassay developed for these studies is the first such assay developed for a bone-specific protein in the rat. This assay employs rabbit antibody directed against rat BGP and has a sensitivity of 0.1 ng. With this assay, BGP levels can be quantitatively measured in rat serum and in the proteins released by acid demineralization of rat bone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2938-2942
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume255
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1980
Externally publishedYes

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Osteocalcin
Minerals
Rats
Bone
Bone and Bones
Acids
Assays
Proteins
Serum
Fetal Proteins
Bone Matrix
Durapatite
Radioimmunoassay
Gel Chromatography
Blood Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Absence of the vitamin K-dependent bone protein in fetal rat mineral. Evidence for another γ-carboxyglutamic acid-containing component in bone. / Price, P. A.; Lothringer, J. W.; Nishimoto, Satoru.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 255, No. 7, 1980, p. 2938-2942.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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