Abundance and location of proteoglycans and hyaluronan within normal and myxomatous mitral valves

Vishal Gupta, Janet E. Barzilla, Joe S. Mendez, Elizabeth H. Stephens, Elaine L. Lee, C. David Collard, Rodolfo Laucirica, Paul H. Weigel, Kathryn J. Grande-Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction: Extracellular matrix changes occur in many heart valve pathologies. For example, myxomatous mitral valves are reported to contain excess proteoglycans and hyaluronan. However, it is unknown which specific proteoglycans are altered in myxomatous valves. Because proteoglycans perform varied functions in connective tissues, this study was designed to identify and localize three matrix-associated proteoglycans, as well as hyaluronan and the hyaluronan receptor for endocytosis, within myxomatous and normal mitral valves. Methods: Human mitral posterior leaflets (control, n=6-9; myxomatous, n=14-21; mean age, 61 years for all groups) were histochemically stained for proteoglycan core proteins, hyaluronan, and the hyaluronan receptor for endocytosis. Stain intensity was semiquantitatively graded to determine differences in marker abundance between normal and myxomatous valves. The proteoglycans were localized to different regions of the leaflet by correspondence to parallel Movat-stained sections. Results: The proteoglycans decorin, biglycan, and versican were more abundant in myxomatous valves than in normal controls (P<.03). There was a gender effect on proteoglycan presence, but no age-related trends were observed. Hyaluronan and the hyaluronan receptor for endocytosis were distributed throughout all valves. There was no significant difference in hyaluronan between groups, but expression of the hyaluronan receptor for endocytosis was reduced in myxomatous valves compared to normal controls (P<.002). Conclusion: Excess decorin, biglycan, and versican may be associated with the remodeling of other matrix components in myxomatous mitral valves. Decreased expression of the hyaluronan receptor for endocytosis in myxomatous valves suggests that hyaluronan metabolism could be altered in myxomatous mitral valve disease. These findings contribute towards elucidating the pathogenesis of myxomatous mitral valve disease and developing potential new therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-197
Number of pages7
JournalCardiovascular Pathology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

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Proteoglycans
Hyaluronic Acid
Mitral Valve
CD44 Antigens
Endocytosis
Versicans
Biglycan
Decorin
Heart Valves
Connective Tissue
Extracellular Matrix
Coloring Agents
Pathology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Gupta, V., Barzilla, J. E., Mendez, J. S., Stephens, E. H., Lee, E. L., Collard, C. D., ... Grande-Allen, K. J. (2009). Abundance and location of proteoglycans and hyaluronan within normal and myxomatous mitral valves. Cardiovascular Pathology, 18(4), 191-197. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.carpath.2008.05.001

Abundance and location of proteoglycans and hyaluronan within normal and myxomatous mitral valves. / Gupta, Vishal; Barzilla, Janet E.; Mendez, Joe S.; Stephens, Elizabeth H.; Lee, Elaine L.; Collard, C. David; Laucirica, Rodolfo; Weigel, Paul H.; Grande-Allen, Kathryn J.

In: Cardiovascular Pathology, Vol. 18, No. 4, 01.07.2009, p. 191-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gupta, V, Barzilla, JE, Mendez, JS, Stephens, EH, Lee, EL, Collard, CD, Laucirica, R, Weigel, PH & Grande-Allen, KJ 2009, 'Abundance and location of proteoglycans and hyaluronan within normal and myxomatous mitral valves', Cardiovascular Pathology, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 191-197. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.carpath.2008.05.001
Gupta, Vishal ; Barzilla, Janet E. ; Mendez, Joe S. ; Stephens, Elizabeth H. ; Lee, Elaine L. ; Collard, C. David ; Laucirica, Rodolfo ; Weigel, Paul H. ; Grande-Allen, Kathryn J. / Abundance and location of proteoglycans and hyaluronan within normal and myxomatous mitral valves. In: Cardiovascular Pathology. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 4. pp. 191-197.
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AU - Stephens, Elizabeth H.

AU - Lee, Elaine L.

AU - Collard, C. David

AU - Laucirica, Rodolfo

AU - Weigel, Paul H.

AU - Grande-Allen, Kathryn J.

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