AC electrokinetic drug delivery in dentistry using an interdigitated electrode assembly powered by inductive coupling

Chris Ivanoff, Jie Jayne Wu, Hadi Mirzajani, Cheng Cheng, Quan Yuan, Stepan Kevorkyan, Radostina Gaydarova, Desislava Tomlekova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AC electrokinetics (ACEK) has been shown to deliver certain drugs into human teeth more effectively than diffusion. However, using electrical wires to power intraoral ACEK devices poses risks to patients. The study demonstrates a novel interdigitated electrode arrays (IDE) assembly powered by inductive coupling to induce ACEK effects at appropriate frequencies to motivate drugs wirelessly. A signal generator produces the modulating signal, which multiplies with the carrier signal to produce the amplitude modulated (AM) signal. The AM signal goes through the inductive link to appear on the secondary coil, then rectified and filtered to dispose of its carrier signal, and the positive half of the modulating signal appears on the load. After characterizing the device, the device is validated under light microscopy by motivating carboxylate-modified microspheres, tetracycline, acetaminophen, benzocaine, lidocaine and carbamide peroxide particles with induced ACEK effects. The assembly is finally tested in a common dental bleaching application. After applying 35 % carbamide peroxide to human teeth topically or with the IDE at 1200 Hz, 5 Vpp for 20 min, spectrophotometric analysis showed that compared to diffusion, the IDE enhanced whitening in specular optic and specular optic excluded modes by 215 % and 194 % respectively. Carbamide peroxide absorbance by the ACEK group was two times greater than diffusion as measured by colorimetric oxidation-reduction and UV-Vis spectroscopy at 550 nm. The device motivates drugs of variable molecular weight and structure wirelessly. Wireless transport of drugs to intraoral targets under ACEK effects may potentially improve the efficacy and safety of drug delivery in dentistry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number84
JournalBiomedical Microdevices
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Dentistry
Peroxides
Drug delivery
Urea
Electrodes
Optics
Equipment and Supplies
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Signal generators
Bleaching
Ultraviolet spectroscopy
Microspheres
Tooth
Molecular structure
Tooth Bleaching
Optical microscopy
Benzocaine
Molecular weight
Wire
Acetaminophen

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

AC electrokinetic drug delivery in dentistry using an interdigitated electrode assembly powered by inductive coupling. / Ivanoff, Chris; Wu, Jie Jayne; Mirzajani, Hadi; Cheng, Cheng; Yuan, Quan; Kevorkyan, Stepan; Gaydarova, Radostina; Tomlekova, Desislava.

In: Biomedical Microdevices, Vol. 18, No. 5, 84, 01.10.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ivanoff, Chris ; Wu, Jie Jayne ; Mirzajani, Hadi ; Cheng, Cheng ; Yuan, Quan ; Kevorkyan, Stepan ; Gaydarova, Radostina ; Tomlekova, Desislava. / AC electrokinetic drug delivery in dentistry using an interdigitated electrode assembly powered by inductive coupling. In: Biomedical Microdevices. 2016 ; Vol. 18, No. 5.
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