Academic progression and retention policies of colleges and schools of Pharmacy

Therese I. Poirier, Theresa M. Kerr, Stephanie Phelps

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To describe academic progression and retention policies used by US colleges and schools of pharmacy. Methods. Student handbooks on the Web sites of 122 colleges and schools of pharmacy were reviewed between February 2012 and May 2012. Results. Data were available and obtained from 98 (80%) programs. Most used grade point average (GPA) as a criterion for progression, with 66% requiring a minimum GPA of 2.0. Cumulative GPA was the most frequently used criteria for probation. Most handbooks did not address remediation, but 38% noted that a failed course could only be retaken once. The most common criteria for dismissal were the cumulative number of times a student was on probation. The graduation requirements of most programs were a cumulative GPA of 2.0 and completion of the program within 6 years of enrollment. Conclusions. Colleges and schools of pharmacy use various criteria for academic progression and retention and frequently provide incomplete or inadequate information related to probation, progression, and dismissal. Information regarding remediation and academic performance during experiential learning is lacking. A clearinghouse containing institutional data related to progression and retention would assist programs in developing academic policies. The study also highlights the need for ACPE to ensure this information is provided to students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Pharmaceutical Education
Volume77
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Pharmacy Schools
probation
Students
dismissal
school
Problem-Based Learning
student
Retention (Psychology)
learning
performance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Academic progression and retention policies of colleges and schools of Pharmacy. / Poirier, Therese I.; Kerr, Theresa M.; Phelps, Stephanie.

In: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, Vol. 77, No. 2, 01.01.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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