Acceptable noise level and psychophysical masking

Dania A. Rishiq, Ashley Harkrider, Mark Hedrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: Individuals with low acceptable noise levels (ANLs) accept more noise than individuals with high ANLs. To determine whether ANL is influenced more by afferent or efferent cortical responsiveness, the authors measured differences in temporal masking responses between individuals with low versus high ANLs. If listeners with low ANLs have masked thresholds similar to those of listeners with high ANLs, low ANLs may be due to reduced afferent responsiveness affecting both the masker and signal. If, however, listeners with low ANLs have masked thresholds better than that of listeners with high ANLs, there may be a physiological basis for improved selective attention via stronger efferent inhibition of the "unwanted" sound. Method: Participants were 19 listeners with normal hearing between the ages of 19 and 35. Ten listeners had low ANLs and 9 had high ANLs. All participants were compared using tone-in-noise simultaneous, forward, and backward masking tasks. Results: Results revealed no observed differences in masked thresholds between the low versus high ANL group. The low ANL group, however, required significantly more threshold runs to achieve criterion necessary for threshold determinations. Conclusions: Findings suggest that low ANLs are associated with reduced afferent cortical responsiveness and, possibly, decreased sustained attention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-205
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Audiology
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 28 2012

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Noise
Hearing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Speech and Hearing

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Acceptable noise level and psychophysical masking. / Rishiq, Dania A.; Harkrider, Ashley; Hedrick, Mark.

In: American Journal of Audiology, Vol. 21, No. 2, 28.12.2012, p. 199-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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