Acetaldehyde-induced barrier disruption and paracellular permeability in caco-2 cell monolayer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A significant body of evidence indicates that endotoxemia plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. There are several possible factors that may be involved in inducing alcoholic endotoxemia, but increased intestinal permeability to enteric endotoxins appears to be the major contributing factor. In the normal gut, the epithelial barrier function prevents diffusion of toxins across the epithelium. However, the barrier is disrupted in patients with alcoholic liver disease. We showed that acetaldehyde disrupts intestinal epithelial tight junctions and increases paracellular permeability to endotoxins in Caco-2 cell monolayer, the extensively studied model of the differentiated intestinal epithelium. The mechanisms involved in acetaldehyde-induced increase in intestinal permeability to endotoxins can be elucidated in this model of the intestinal epithelium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAlcohol
Subtitle of host publicationMethods and Protocols
PublisherHumana Press
Pages171-183
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9781588299062
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume447
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

Fingerprint

Caco-2 Cells
Acetaldehyde
Endotoxins
Permeability
Alcoholic Liver Diseases
Endotoxemia
Intestinal Mucosa
Tight Junctions
Epithelium

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Rao, R. (2008). Acetaldehyde-induced barrier disruption and paracellular permeability in caco-2 cell monolayer. In Alcohol: Methods and Protocols (pp. 171-183). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 447). Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-242-7_13

Acetaldehyde-induced barrier disruption and paracellular permeability in caco-2 cell monolayer. / Rao, Radhakrishna.

Alcohol: Methods and Protocols. Humana Press, 2008. p. 171-183 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 447).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Rao, R 2008, Acetaldehyde-induced barrier disruption and paracellular permeability in caco-2 cell monolayer. in Alcohol: Methods and Protocols. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 447, Humana Press, pp. 171-183. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-242-7_13
Rao R. Acetaldehyde-induced barrier disruption and paracellular permeability in caco-2 cell monolayer. In Alcohol: Methods and Protocols. Humana Press. 2008. p. 171-183. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-242-7_13
Rao, Radhakrishna. / Acetaldehyde-induced barrier disruption and paracellular permeability in caco-2 cell monolayer. Alcohol: Methods and Protocols. Humana Press, 2008. pp. 171-183 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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