Acetylcholine as a brain state modulator

Triggering and long-term regulation of REM sleep

J. A. Hobson, Subimal Datta, J. M. Calvo, J. Quattrochi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the major conceptual and empirical challenges confronting behavioral neurobiology is to develop theoretical models and experimental paradigms that will help to understand how single cells and their specific chemical signals come to be organized at the level of population ensembles in order to determine the global behavioral states of waking and sleep. To help meet this challenge, recent discoveries suggesting a role for acetylcholine containing neurons in both the triggering and long-term regulation of REM sleep offer inviting and instructive opportunities. It is the main purpose of this chapter to provide a detailed review of a recent and unexpected discovery: the long-term potentiation of REM sleep following the micro-injection of the cholinergic agonist carbachol into the cholinergic neuronal population of the peribrachial pontine tegmentum. Following a brief summary of the background of the cholinergic hypothesis of REM sleep generation and the current concept of the cellular nature of the REM sleep generator network, this chapter discusses the general neurobiology of the peribrachial area, and focus on its cholinergic neuronal sub-population as a prelude to a detailed account of the long-term REM sleep enhancement that follows the microinjection of carbachol into this zone. It discusses this finding in terms of a new, “cholinergic priming” hypothesis, which attributes the surprisingly long duration of the response to the setting in motion of an endogenous metabolic mechanism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-404
Number of pages16
JournalProgress in Brain Research
Volume98
Issue numberC
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

REM Sleep
Acetylcholine
Cholinergic Agents
Brain
Neurobiology
Carbachol
Population
Cholinergic Agonists
Long-Term Potentiation
Microinjections
Sleep
Theoretical Models
Neurons
Injections

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Acetylcholine as a brain state modulator : Triggering and long-term regulation of REM sleep. / Hobson, J. A.; Datta, Subimal; Calvo, J. M.; Quattrochi, J.

In: Progress in Brain Research, Vol. 98, No. C, 01.01.1993, p. 389-404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hobson, J. A. ; Datta, Subimal ; Calvo, J. M. ; Quattrochi, J. / Acetylcholine as a brain state modulator : Triggering and long-term regulation of REM sleep. In: Progress in Brain Research. 1993 ; Vol. 98, No. C. pp. 389-404.
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