Acquired thrombophilia

Emily M. Armstrong, Jessica M. Bellone, Lori B. Hornsby, Sarah Eudaley, Haley M. Phillippe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acquired thrombophilia is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the most prevalent acquired thrombophilia and is associated with both venous and arterial thromboses. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is another form of acquired thrombophilia. Risk factors associated with VTE in this population include those related to the disease itself, host factors, and the pharmacotherapy for HIV. A significant proportion of VTE events occur in patients with malignancies. There is an increase in mortality associated with patients having cancer who experience VTE when compared to patients having cancer without VTE. Combination oral contraceptive (COC) use infers risk of thromboembolic events. The risk is dependent upon the presence of an underlying inherited thrombophilia, the estrogen dose, and generation of progestin. Patients at highest risk of VTE include those receiving high-dose estrogen and fourth-generation, progesterone-containing contraceptives. With the exception of APS, thrombophilia status does not alter the acute treatment of an initial VTE in nonpregnant patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-242
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pharmacy Practice
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Thrombophilia
Venous Thromboembolism
Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Estrogens
HIV
Neoplasms
Progestins
Oral Contraceptives
Contraceptive Agents
Venous Thrombosis
Progesterone
Drug Therapy
Mortality
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Armstrong, E. M., Bellone, J. M., Hornsby, L. B., Eudaley, S., & Phillippe, H. M. (2014). Acquired thrombophilia. Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 27(3), 234-242. https://doi.org/10.1177/0897190014530424

Acquired thrombophilia. / Armstrong, Emily M.; Bellone, Jessica M.; Hornsby, Lori B.; Eudaley, Sarah; Phillippe, Haley M.

In: Journal of Pharmacy Practice, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 234-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Armstrong, EM, Bellone, JM, Hornsby, LB, Eudaley, S & Phillippe, HM 2014, 'Acquired thrombophilia', Journal of Pharmacy Practice, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 234-242. https://doi.org/10.1177/0897190014530424
Armstrong EM, Bellone JM, Hornsby LB, Eudaley S, Phillippe HM. Acquired thrombophilia. Journal of Pharmacy Practice. 2014 Jan 1;27(3):234-242. https://doi.org/10.1177/0897190014530424
Armstrong, Emily M. ; Bellone, Jessica M. ; Hornsby, Lori B. ; Eudaley, Sarah ; Phillippe, Haley M. / Acquired thrombophilia. In: Journal of Pharmacy Practice. 2014 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 234-242.
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