Acquisition of hearing aids and assistive listening devices among the pediatric hearing-impaired population

Fannie S. Leake, Jerome W. Thompson, Erin Simms, James Bailey, Rose Mary S. Stocks, Anne M. Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sufficient access to health care is of concern to the indigent population in the US and to their health care providers. This study was undertaken to elucidate the rate of the follow-up among lower socioeconomic hearing-impaired pediatric patients who had received a recommendation for hearing aids and/or assistive listening devices. Our question was, would the families’ financial situation have a negative effect on the acquisition of hearing aids and assistive listening devices? Fifty patients, age 0-18 years, who had been seen in our clinic over 2 years were evaluated via a telephone survey. The survey consisted of seven questions, including whether or not the devices or aids were obtained, what type was purchased, where the device was being used, and the child’s apparent performance with the device. Eighty-two percent of our patients were on TennCare, a state mandated Medicaid HMO system. Two-thirds of these TennCare patients are at or below the poverty level and the remaining one-third is either disabled or uninsurable according to the Aid for Dependent Children (AFDC) with indeterminate income. In addition the TennCare organization did not cover hearing amplification equipment for these children. The study showed that the majority of the patients did follow-up as recommended. Furthermore, this equipment is easily obtainable for the pediatric indigent population due to financial resources available in the community outside the mandated Medicaid system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-251
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 30 2000

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Self-Help Devices
Hearing Aids
Hearing
Pediatrics
Equipment and Supplies
Poverty
Population
Medicaid
Health Services Accessibility
Health Maintenance Organizations
Telephone
Health Personnel
Organizations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Acquisition of hearing aids and assistive listening devices among the pediatric hearing-impaired population. / Leake, Fannie S.; Thompson, Jerome W.; Simms, Erin; Bailey, James; Stocks, Rose Mary S.; Murphy, Anne M.

In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, Vol. 52, No. 3, 30.05.2000, p. 247-251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leake, Fannie S. ; Thompson, Jerome W. ; Simms, Erin ; Bailey, James ; Stocks, Rose Mary S. ; Murphy, Anne M. / Acquisition of hearing aids and assistive listening devices among the pediatric hearing-impaired population. In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology. 2000 ; Vol. 52, No. 3. pp. 247-251.
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