Activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-tropomyosin receptor kinase B signaling in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus

a novel mechanism for the homeostatic regulation of rapid eye movement sleep

Abigail K. Barnes, Richa Koul-Tiwari, Jennifer M. Garner, Phillip A. Geist, Subimal Datta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep dysregulation is a symptom of many neuropsychiatric disorders, yet the mechanisms of REM sleep homeostatic regulation are not fully understood. We have shown that, after REM sleep deprivation, the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) plays a critical role in the generation of recovery REM sleep. In this study, we used multidisciplinary techniques to show a causal relationship between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) signaling in the PPT and the development of REM sleep homeostatic drive. Rats were randomly assigned to conditions of unrestricted sleep or selective REM sleep deprivation (RSD) with PPT microinjections of vehicle control or a dose of a TrkB receptor inhibitor (2, 3, or 4 nmol K252a or 4 nmol ANA-12). On experimental days, rats received PPT microinjections and their sleep-wake physiological signals were recorded for 3 or 6 h, during which selective RSD was performed in the first 3 h. At the end of all 3 h recordings, rats were killed and the PPT was dissected out for BDNF quantification. Our results show that K252a and ANA-12 dose-dependently reduced the homeostatic responses to selective RSD. Specifically, TrkB receptor inhibition reduced REM sleep homeostatic drive and limited REM sleep rebound. There was also a dose-dependent suppression of PPT BDNF up-regulation, and regression analysis revealed a significant positive relationship between REM sleep homeostatic drive and the level of PPT BDNF expression. These data provide the first direct evidence that activation of BDNF-TrkB signaling in the PPT is a critical step for the development of REM sleep homeostatic drive. (Figure presented.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-123
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume141
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus
trkB Receptor
Tropomyosin
Eye movements
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
REM Sleep
Sleep
Phosphotransferases
Chemical activation
Sleep Deprivation
Microinjections
Rats
tropomyosin kinase
Up-Regulation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-tropomyosin receptor kinase B signaling in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus : a novel mechanism for the homeostatic regulation of rapid eye movement sleep. / Barnes, Abigail K.; Koul-Tiwari, Richa; Garner, Jennifer M.; Geist, Phillip A.; Datta, Subimal.

In: Journal of Neurochemistry, Vol. 141, No. 1, 01.04.2017, p. 111-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep dysregulation is a symptom of many neuropsychiatric disorders, yet the mechanisms of REM sleep homeostatic regulation are not fully understood. We have shown that, after REM sleep deprivation, the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) plays a critical role in the generation of recovery REM sleep. In this study, we used multidisciplinary techniques to show a causal relationship between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) signaling in the PPT and the development of REM sleep homeostatic drive. Rats were randomly assigned to conditions of unrestricted sleep or selective REM sleep deprivation (RSD) with PPT microinjections of vehicle control or a dose of a TrkB receptor inhibitor (2, 3, or 4 nmol K252a or 4 nmol ANA-12). On experimental days, rats received PPT microinjections and their sleep-wake physiological signals were recorded for 3 or 6 h, during which selective RSD was performed in the first 3 h. At the end of all 3 h recordings, rats were killed and the PPT was dissected out for BDNF quantification. Our results show that K252a and ANA-12 dose-dependently reduced the homeostatic responses to selective RSD. Specifically, TrkB receptor inhibition reduced REM sleep homeostatic drive and limited REM sleep rebound. There was also a dose-dependent suppression of PPT BDNF up-regulation, and regression analysis revealed a significant positive relationship between REM sleep homeostatic drive and the level of PPT BDNF expression. These data provide the first direct evidence that activation of BDNF-TrkB signaling in the PPT is a critical step for the development of REM sleep homeostatic drive. (Figure presented.).",
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