Activation of Phasic Pontine-Wave Generator Prevents Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Deprivation-Induced Learning Impairment in the Rat

A Mechanism for Sleep-Dependent Plasticity

Subimal Datta, Vijayakumar Mavanji, Jagadish Ulloor, Elissa H. Patterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

122 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Animal and human studies of sleep and learning have demonstrated that training on various tasks increases subsequent rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and phasic pontine-wave (P-wave) activity, followed by improvement in performance on the learned task. It is well documented that REM sleep deprivation after learning trials blocks the expected improvement in performance on subsequent retesting. Our aim was to test whether experimentally induced P-wave generator activation could eliminate the learning impairment produced by post-training REM sleep deprivation. Rats were trained on a two-way active avoidance-learning task. Immediately thereafter, two groups of those rats received a control vehicle (100 nl saline) microinjection and one group received a carbachol (50 ng in 100 nl saline) microinjection into the P-wave generator. The carbachol-injected group and one of the two control saline microinjected groups were selectively deprived of REM sleep during a 6 hr polygraphic recording session. All rats were then tested on the avoidance-learning task. The rats that received both the control saline injection and REM sleep deprivation showed learning deficits compared with the control saline-injected rats that were allowed to sleep normally. In contrast, the rats that received the carbachol microinjection and REM sleep deprivation demonstrated normal learning. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that carbachol-induced activation of the P-wave generator prevents the memory-impairing effects of post-training REM sleep deprivation. This evidence supports our hypothesis that the activation of the P-wave generator during REM sleep deprivation enhances a physiological process of memory, which occurs naturally during post-training REM sleep.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1416-1427
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 11 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Sleep Deprivation
REM Sleep
Sleep
Learning
Carbachol
Microinjections
Avoidance Learning
Physiological Phenomena
Problem-Based Learning
Injections

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Activation of Phasic Pontine-Wave Generator Prevents Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Deprivation-Induced Learning Impairment in the Rat : A Mechanism for Sleep-Dependent Plasticity. / Datta, Subimal; Mavanji, Vijayakumar; Ulloor, Jagadish; Patterson, Elissa H.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 24, No. 6, 11.02.2004, p. 1416-1427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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