Activation of receptor for advanced glycation end products: A mechanism for chronic vascular dysfunction in diabetic vasculopathy and atherosclerosis

Ann Marie Schmidt, Shi Du Yan, Jean Luc Wautier, David Stern

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

629 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules and engages diverse ligands relevant to distinct pathological processes. One class of RAGE ligands includes glycoxidation products, termed advanced glycation end products, which occur in diabetes, at sites of oxidant stress in tissues, and in renal failure and amyloidoses. RAGE also functions as a signal transduction receptor for amyloid β peptide, known to accumulate in Alzheimer disease in both affected brain parenchyma and cerebral vasculature. Interaction of RAGE with these ligands enhances receptor expression and initiates a positive feedback loop whereby receptor occupancy triggers increased RAGE expression, thereby perpetuating another wave of cellular activation. Sustained expression of RAGE by critical target cells, including endothelium, smooth muscle cells, mononuclear phagocytes, and neurons, in proximity to these ligands, sets the stage for chronic cellular activation and tissue damage. in a model of accelerated atherosclerosis associated with diabetes in genetically manipulated mice, blockade of cell surface RAGE by infusion of a soluble, truncated form of the receptor completely suppressed enhanced formation of vascular lesions. Amelioration of atherosclerosis in these diabetic/atherosclerotic animals by soluble RAGE occurred in the absence of changes in plasma lipids or glycemia, emphasizing the contribution of a lipid- and glycemia-independent mechanism(s) to atherogenesis, which we postulate to be interaction of RAGE with its ligands. Future studies using mice in which RAGE expression has been genetically manipulated and with selective low molecular weight RAGE inhibitors will be required to definitively assign a critical role for RAGE activation in diabetic vasculopathy. However, sustained receptor expression in a microenvironment with a plethora of ligand makes possible prolonged receptor stimulation, suggesting that interaction of cellular RAGE with its ligands could be a factor contributing to a range of important chronic disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-497
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation research
Volume84
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 1999

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Blood Vessels
Atherosclerosis
Ligands
Advanced Glycosylation End Product-Specific Receptor
Lipids
Advanced Glycosylation End Products
Peptide Receptors
Cell Surface Receptors
Amyloidosis
Pathologic Processes
Phagocytes
Amyloid
Oxidants
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Endothelium
Renal Insufficiency
Immunoglobulins
Signal Transduction
Alzheimer Disease
Molecular Weight

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Activation of receptor for advanced glycation end products : A mechanism for chronic vascular dysfunction in diabetic vasculopathy and atherosclerosis. / Schmidt, Ann Marie; Yan, Shi Du; Wautier, Jean Luc; Stern, David.

In: Circulation research, Vol. 84, No. 5, 19.03.1999, p. 489-497.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

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