Acute effect of nicotine on auditory gating in smokers and non-smokers

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Abstract

This paper investigates the role of cholinergic mechanisms in auditory gating by assessing the acute effects of nicotine, an acetylcholinomimetic drug, on behavioral and electrophysiological measures of consonant-vowel (CV) discrimination in quiet and in broadband noise (BBN). In a single-blind procedure, categorical boundaries and mismatch negativity (MMN) in two conditions (quiet, BBN) were obtained from 10 non-smokers and 4 smokers with normal hearing under two drug conditions (nicotine, placebo). After the nicotine sessions, plasma tests revealed a subject's nicotine concentration and subjects reported any symptoms. Larger MMN areas and steeper slopes at the boundary were interpreted as reflecting better electrophysiological and behavioral CV discrimination, respectively. Results indicate that, in non-smokers, the effects of nicotine on electrophysiological CV discrimination in quiet increase with an increase in severity of symptoms. Specifically, asymptomatic non-smokers (N = 5) demonstrate little improvement (and sometimes decrements) in performance while symptomatic non-smokers (N = 5) exhibit nicotine-enhanced discrimination, as do smokers. In noise, all subjects demonstrate nicotine-enhanced behavioral and electrophysiological discrimination. Additionally, in noise, smokers exhibit a larger number of measurable categorical boundaries as well as larger MMN areas than non-smokers in both placebo and nicotine sessions. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that nicotinic cholinergic mechanisms play a role in the gating of auditory stimuli.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)114-128
Number of pages15
JournalHearing Research
Volume202
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

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Nicotine
Noise
Cholinergic Agents
Placebos
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Hearing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Acute effect of nicotine on auditory gating in smokers and non-smokers. / Harkrider, Ashley; Hedrick, Mark.

In: Hearing Research, Vol. 202, No. 1-2, 01.01.2005, p. 114-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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