Acute pancreatitis as a complication of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy can be an effective procedure performed with low morbidity. We have observed clinically significant pancreatitis after successful clot extraction by percutaneous thrombectomy. Pancreatitis developed postoperatively in four patients who underwent thrombectomy at our hospital. Each patient experienced abdominal symptoms with serologic and radiographic evidence of pancreatitis ≤24 hours after thrombectomy. The presence of renal failure and extensive clot degradation seemed to be related. Two of the patients underwent surgery that potentially could have been avoided had the etiology of pancreatitis been known preoperatively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)366-368
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2007

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Thrombectomy
Pancreatitis
Renal Insufficiency
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Acute pancreatitis as a complication of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy. / Lebow, Michael; Cassada, David; Grandas, Oscar; Stevens, Scott; Goldman, Mitchell; Freeman, Michael.

In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 46, No. 2, 01.08.2007, p. 366-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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