Adenovirus 7a

A community acquired outbreak in a children's hospital

L. S. Mitchell, B. Taylor, B. Reimels, F. F. Barrett, John Devincenzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Adenoviruses produce many illnesses in children, particularly respiratory and gastrointestinal disease. The most common adenoviral respiratory infections in children are due to types 1, 2, 3, and 5. Serotype 7a has been responsible for outbreaks of respiratory disease in children in close proximity with one another such as in intensive care units, long term pediatric care facilities, children's homes, orphanages, or within a household. This report describes a large community acquired adenovirus 7a epidemic in children who were hospitalized. Methods: This hospital serves a population of over one million and is the only solely pediatric inpatient facility in the region. All viral cultures obtained between March 1st and July 26th, 1997 which grew adenovirus were frozen back and typed. Hospital records from these patients were reviewed. Results: Adenovirus was cultured from 51 specimens, representing 47 patients admitted to the hospital during this period. These 51 isolates represented 12% of all viral isolates and 14% of all viral respiratory isolates collected during this time period. Of these 47 patients, 26 (55%) were infected with adenovirus 7a representing 8% of all viral respiratory isolates from this period. Twenty four (92%) of the adenovirus 7a infections were community acquired. Two (8%) were nosocomial. The age range was 11 days to 4 years with a mean of 13.3 months. Twenty three patients (88.5%) had respiratory symptoms and 22 (84.6%) had fever, making these the most common symptoms. Other signs and symptoms included 6 (23%) patients with gastrointestinal complaints, 5 (19%) with otitis media, 4 (15%) with conjunctivitis, 2 (8%) with rash, 2 (8%) with tonsillitis, 1 (3.8%) with sinusitis, 1 (3.8%) with aseptic meningitis, and 2 (8%) with sepsis. Fifty-eight percent of the patients had no chronic medical condition on admission. One patient with sepsis died of progressive pneumonia resulting in a mortality rate in the hospitalized patients of 3.8%. The mean duration of hospitalization was 7 days. Conclusions: In addition to causing outbreaks in closed environments, adenovirus 7a can cause large epidemics affecting children in open communities. The disease produced by adenovirus 7a is almost exclusively respiratory tract disease which may be very severe and possibly fatal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Investigative Medicine
Volume47
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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Adenoviridae
Disease Outbreaks
Pulmonary diseases
Pediatrics
Intensive care units
Sepsis
Orphanages
Aseptic Meningitis
Adenoviridae Infections
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Tonsillitis
Conjunctivitis
Hospital Records
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Sinusitis
Otitis Media
Long-Term Care
Exanthema
Respiratory Tract Infections
Signs and Symptoms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Adenovirus 7a : A community acquired outbreak in a children's hospital. / Mitchell, L. S.; Taylor, B.; Reimels, B.; Barrett, F. F.; Devincenzo, John.

In: Journal of Investigative Medicine, Vol. 47, No. 2, 01.01.1999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mitchell, L. S. ; Taylor, B. ; Reimels, B. ; Barrett, F. F. ; Devincenzo, John. / Adenovirus 7a : A community acquired outbreak in a children's hospital. In: Journal of Investigative Medicine. 1999 ; Vol. 47, No. 2.
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abstract = "Background: Adenoviruses produce many illnesses in children, particularly respiratory and gastrointestinal disease. The most common adenoviral respiratory infections in children are due to types 1, 2, 3, and 5. Serotype 7a has been responsible for outbreaks of respiratory disease in children in close proximity with one another such as in intensive care units, long term pediatric care facilities, children's homes, orphanages, or within a household. This report describes a large community acquired adenovirus 7a epidemic in children who were hospitalized. Methods: This hospital serves a population of over one million and is the only solely pediatric inpatient facility in the region. All viral cultures obtained between March 1st and July 26th, 1997 which grew adenovirus were frozen back and typed. Hospital records from these patients were reviewed. Results: Adenovirus was cultured from 51 specimens, representing 47 patients admitted to the hospital during this period. These 51 isolates represented 12{\%} of all viral isolates and 14{\%} of all viral respiratory isolates collected during this time period. Of these 47 patients, 26 (55{\%}) were infected with adenovirus 7a representing 8{\%} of all viral respiratory isolates from this period. Twenty four (92{\%}) of the adenovirus 7a infections were community acquired. Two (8{\%}) were nosocomial. The age range was 11 days to 4 years with a mean of 13.3 months. Twenty three patients (88.5{\%}) had respiratory symptoms and 22 (84.6{\%}) had fever, making these the most common symptoms. Other signs and symptoms included 6 (23{\%}) patients with gastrointestinal complaints, 5 (19{\%}) with otitis media, 4 (15{\%}) with conjunctivitis, 2 (8{\%}) with rash, 2 (8{\%}) with tonsillitis, 1 (3.8{\%}) with sinusitis, 1 (3.8{\%}) with aseptic meningitis, and 2 (8{\%}) with sepsis. Fifty-eight percent of the patients had no chronic medical condition on admission. One patient with sepsis died of progressive pneumonia resulting in a mortality rate in the hospitalized patients of 3.8{\%}. The mean duration of hospitalization was 7 days. Conclusions: In addition to causing outbreaks in closed environments, adenovirus 7a can cause large epidemics affecting children in open communities. The disease produced by adenovirus 7a is almost exclusively respiratory tract disease which may be very severe and possibly fatal.",
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T2 - A community acquired outbreak in a children's hospital

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AU - Devincenzo, John

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