Adequacy of sulfur amino acid intake in infants receiving parenteral nutrition

Richard Helms, Michael Christensen, Michael C. Storm, Russell W. Chesney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Taurine and cysteine are considered essential nutrients for the infant receiving parenteral nutrition (PN). To define the adequacy of sulfur amino acid content in a pediatric amino acid formulation, evaluation of urinary excretion, fractional excretion, and balance studies for taurine, total (free + bound) cyst(e)ine (cysteine + cystine), and methionine were completed under steady-state conditions of energy and protein intake in 18 preterm infants receiving PN. These infants had a mean gestational age of 34.5 ± 2.4 weeks, postnatal age of 19 ± 18 days, weighed 2.1 ± 0.5 kg, and received 100 ± 22 kcal/kg/day and 2.8 ± 0.1 g/kg/day of amino acids. Plasma concentrations for the sulfur-containing amino acids were within the reference range; however, the excretion and fractional excretion of taurine (3.7 ± 7.8 mg/kg/day, 17 ± 15%) and cyst(e)ine (12.0 ± 7.1 mg/kg/day, 33 ±19%) were at the upper limits of normal reported experience. Methionine excretion (0.9 ± 1.0 mg/kg/day) and fractional excretion (16 ± 22%) were within normal reported experience. For taurine, fractional excretion inversely correlated with weight at the time of study (r = -0.59, P < 0.001), while for total cyst(e)ine and methionine, no correlation could be found for gestational age, postconceptional age, or weight. Taurine excretion may be a result of varying renal maturity in the study infants, and dosing may need to be adjusted based on renal maturity. Excessive dosing may explain cysteine excretion, while methionine excretion and fractional excretion suggest appropriate dosing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)462-466
Number of pages5
JournalThe Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Volume6
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Sulfur Amino Acids
Taurine
Parenteral Nutrition
Nutrition
Cysteine
Methionine
Cystine
Amino Acids
Gestational Age
Kidney
Weights and Measures
Pediatrics
Time and Motion Studies
Energy Intake
Sulfur
Premature Infants
Nutrients
Reference Values
Plasmas
Food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Adequacy of sulfur amino acid intake in infants receiving parenteral nutrition. / Helms, Richard; Christensen, Michael; Storm, Michael C.; Chesney, Russell W.

In: The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, Vol. 6, No. 9, 01.01.1995, p. 462-466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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