Administration of pamidronate alters bone-titanium attachment in the presence of endotoxin-coated polyethylene particles

Zhiqing Xing, Karen Hasty, Richard Smith

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bisphosphonates are promising in the treatment of periprosthetic osteolysis induced by particulate wear debris. The in vivo effects of pamidronate with different doses and durations of administration on bone-titanium attachment in the presence of endotoxin-coated polyethylene particles were examined in a rat model in this study. Titanium pins and endotoxin-coated polyethylene particles were introduced into rat femoral canals followed by intraperitoneal injection of pamidronate every other day. The treatment varied in the dose from 0 to 40 μg/kg and the duration of either 10 days or 6 weeks. Bilateral femurs were harvested after 6 weeks and examined by bone densitometer and MicroCT scan. Pamidronate increased the bone density of the left, unoperated femurs in a dose and duration dependent manner. Bone-titanium attachment significantly increased in all treatment groups compared to the control group. When pamidronate was administered for 10 days, the increase of bone-titanium attachment was significantly dose-dependent. However, when pamidronate was given for 6 weeks at 4 μg/kg, the bone-titanium attachment was significantly (p < 0.001) lower compared to the 10 day treatment of the same dose, although it was significantly higher than controls. Our results suggest that pamidronate effectively increase bone-titanium attachment even in the presence of endotoxin-coated polyethylene particles. However, long-term administration may reduce its efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-358
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials
Volume83
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007

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pamidronate
Polyethylene
Titanium
Endotoxins
Polyethylenes
Bone
Rats
Densitometers
Diphosphonates
Canals
Debris

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "Bisphosphonates are promising in the treatment of periprosthetic osteolysis induced by particulate wear debris. The in vivo effects of pamidronate with different doses and durations of administration on bone-titanium attachment in the presence of endotoxin-coated polyethylene particles were examined in a rat model in this study. Titanium pins and endotoxin-coated polyethylene particles were introduced into rat femoral canals followed by intraperitoneal injection of pamidronate every other day. The treatment varied in the dose from 0 to 40 μg/kg and the duration of either 10 days or 6 weeks. Bilateral femurs were harvested after 6 weeks and examined by bone densitometer and MicroCT scan. Pamidronate increased the bone density of the left, unoperated femurs in a dose and duration dependent manner. Bone-titanium attachment significantly increased in all treatment groups compared to the control group. When pamidronate was administered for 10 days, the increase of bone-titanium attachment was significantly dose-dependent. However, when pamidronate was given for 6 weeks at 4 μg/kg, the bone-titanium attachment was significantly (p < 0.001) lower compared to the 10 day treatment of the same dose, although it was significantly higher than controls. Our results suggest that pamidronate effectively increase bone-titanium attachment even in the presence of endotoxin-coated polyethylene particles. However, long-term administration may reduce its efficacy.",
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