Adolescents and parental caregivers as lay health advisers in a community-based risk reduction intervention for youth

Baseline data from Teach One, Reach One

Tiarney D. Ritchwood, Gaurav Dave, Dana L. Carthron, Malika Roman Isler, Connie Blumenthal, Mysha Wynn, Adebowale Odulana, Feng Chang Lin, Aletha Y. Akers, Giselle Corbie-Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the current study is to describe the demographic, behavioral, and psychosocial characteristics of adolescent and caregiver lay health advisers (LHAs) participating in an intervention designed to reduce risk behaviors among rural African-American adolescents. Teach One, Reach One integrates constructs from the Theory of Planned Behavior and Social Cognitive Theory. It acknowledges that changing the sexual behaviors of African-American adolescents requires changing one's knowledge, attitudes, normative beliefs about the behavior of peers, and self-efficacy regarding adolescent sexual behavior, parent-teen communication about sex, and healthy dating relations among adolescents. Study participants completed baseline questionnaires assessing demographics and psychosocial determinants (knowledge, attitudes, perceived social norms, and self-efficacy) of sexual behaviors. Sixty-two adolescent and caregiver dyads participated. Caregivers included biological parents, legal guardians, or other parental figures. Strengths and areas in need of improvement were determined using median splits. Few adolescents had initiated sex. Their strengths included high levels of open parent-teen communication; positive attitudes and normative beliefs regarding both sex communication and healthy dating relationships; and high knowledge and self-efficacy for healthy dating behaviors. Areas needing improvement included low knowledge, unfavorable attitudes, poor normative beliefs, and low self-efficacy regarding condom use. Caregiver strengths included positive attitudes, normative beliefs, and self-efficacy for sex communication; positive attitudes and self-efficacy for condom use; and low acceptance of couple violence. Areas needing improvement included low levels of actual communication about sex and low knowledge about effective communication strategies and condom use. The current study highlights the value of assessing baseline characteristics of LHAs prior to intervention implementation, as it enables a better understanding of the key characteristics necessary for planning and implementing interventions, as well as engaging in targeted training activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)537-542
Number of pages6
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Risk Reduction Behavior
Caregivers
caregiver
Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
adolescent
Communication
Health
health
communication
community
Condoms
Sexual Behavior
parents
African Americans
Legal Guardians
Demography
cognitive theory
Adolescent Behavior
Social Norms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Adolescents and parental caregivers as lay health advisers in a community-based risk reduction intervention for youth : Baseline data from Teach One, Reach One. / Ritchwood, Tiarney D.; Dave, Gaurav; Carthron, Dana L.; Isler, Malika Roman; Blumenthal, Connie; Wynn, Mysha; Odulana, Adebowale; Lin, Feng Chang; Akers, Aletha Y.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, Vol. 28, No. 4, 02.04.2016, p. 537-542.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ritchwood, Tiarney D. ; Dave, Gaurav ; Carthron, Dana L. ; Isler, Malika Roman ; Blumenthal, Connie ; Wynn, Mysha ; Odulana, Adebowale ; Lin, Feng Chang ; Akers, Aletha Y. ; Corbie-Smith, Giselle. / Adolescents and parental caregivers as lay health advisers in a community-based risk reduction intervention for youth : Baseline data from Teach One, Reach One. In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV. 2016 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 537-542.
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