Advances in MRSA drug discovery

Where are we and where do we need to be?

Michio Kurosu, Shajila Siricilla, Katsuhiko Mitachi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been on the increase during the past decade, due to the steady growth of the elderly and immunocompromised patients, and the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains. Although there are a limited number of anti-MRSA drugs available, a number of different combination antimicrobial drug regimens have been used to treat serious MRSA infections. Thus, the addition of several new antistaphylococcal drugs into clinical practice should broaden clinician's therapeutic options. As MRSA is one of the most common and problematic bacteria associated with increasing antimicrobial resistance, continuous efforts for the discovery of lead compounds as well as development of alternative therapies and faster diagnostics are required. Areas covered: This article summarizes the FDA-approved drugs to treat MRSA infections, the drugs in clinical trials, and the drug leads for MRSA and related Gram-positive bacterial infections. In addition, the article discusses the mode of action of antistaphylococcal molecules and the resistant mechanisms of some molecules. Expert opinion: The number of pipeline drugs presently undergoing clinical trials is not particularly encouraging. There are limited and rather expensive therapeutic options for MRSA infections in the critically ill. Further research efforts are required for effective phage therapy on MRSA infections in clinical use, which seem to be attractive therapeutic options for the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1095-1116
Number of pages22
JournalExpert Opinion on Drug Discovery
Volume8
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

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Drug Discovery
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Infection
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections
Clinical Trials
Expert Testimony
Immunocompromised Host
Drug Combinations
Complementary Therapies
Critical Illness
Therapeutics
Bacteria
Growth
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

Advances in MRSA drug discovery : Where are we and where do we need to be? / Kurosu, Michio; Siricilla, Shajila; Mitachi, Katsuhiko.

In: Expert Opinion on Drug Discovery, Vol. 8, No. 9, 01.09.2013, p. 1095-1116.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kurosu, Michio ; Siricilla, Shajila ; Mitachi, Katsuhiko. / Advances in MRSA drug discovery : Where are we and where do we need to be?. In: Expert Opinion on Drug Discovery. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 9. pp. 1095-1116.
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