Advances in the Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting

New Data From Recent and Ongoing Trials

Eric Roeland, Matti S. Aapro, Lee Schwartzberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is among the most feared and debilitating adverse events experienced by cancer patients. Left unaddressed, CINV symptoms not only decrease quality of life, but may also affect patients' willingness to continue chemotherapy treatment. Detailed guidelines are available that outline best practices for prophylaxis of acute and delayed CINV. However, adherence to guideline recommendations continues to be suboptimal, and many patients still suffer unnecessarily from CINV. In addition, breakthrough/refractory CINV continues to present particular challenges. The development of effective CINV treatments with diverse mechanisms of action has expanded the options available for preventing symptoms. The US Food and Drug Administration has recently approved several new therapies for the management of CINV. NEPA is a fixed-dose combination of netupitant(300 mg) plus palonosetron (0.5 mg). In combination with dexamethasone, NEPA has demonstrated superior efficacyto palonosetron alone in patients receiving highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. Rolapitant is a next generation neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonist. Both palonosetron and rolapitant have proven particularly effective in controlling delayed CINV. Regimens that combine a serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine–3 receptor antagonist, an NK1receptor antagonist, and a corticosteroid now represent the standard of care for managing both acute and delayed CINV in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalClinical advances in hematology & oncology : H&O
Volume13
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Nausea
Vomiting
Drug Therapy
Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists
Guideline Adherence
United States Food and Drug Administration
Standard of Care
Practice Guidelines
Dexamethasone
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Therapeutics
Quality of Life
Guidelines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Advances in the Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting : New Data From Recent and Ongoing Trials. / Roeland, Eric; Aapro, Matti S.; Schwartzberg, Lee.

In: Clinical advances in hematology & oncology : H&O, Vol. 13, No. 10, 01.10.2015, p. 1-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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