Aerosol delivery systems

Maximizing benefits, avoiding pitfalls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Factors that determine aerosol deposition within the respiratory tract include size of the aerosol particles, breathing pattern, mouth versus nose inhalation, age, and airway caliber and patency. High inspiratory flow rates and low tidal volumes are associated with greater deposition of inhaled drug in the upper airways, whereas low inspiratory flow rates and larger tidal volumes improve drug delivery to the lung. Children with acute severe asthma may not have high enough inspiratory flow rates for such breath-actuated devices as dry powder inhalers. Moreover, they may not be able to coordinate inspiration with metered-dose inhaler (MDI) actuation or to hold their breath after inhaling the aerosol. Similarly, elderly patients may he unable to actuate MDIs, and they often have faulty inhalation technique. Nebulizers may be useful for delivering bronchodilators to acutely ill patients who are confused, disoriented, extremely fatigued, extremely dyspneic, or unable to understand the use of an MDI or an MDI and spacer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)358-365
Number of pages8
JournalConsultant
Volume40
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Metered Dose Inhalers
Aerosols
Inhalation
Tidal Volume
Mouth Breathing
Dry Powder Inhalers
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Bronchodilator Agents
Nose
Particle Size
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Respiratory System
Asthma
Equipment and Supplies
Lung

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Aerosol delivery systems : Maximizing benefits, avoiding pitfalls. / Dhand, Rajiv.

In: Consultant, Vol. 40, No. 2, 01.02.2000, p. 358-365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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